Muhammad Rashid Best Project Award

Thanks to the generous endowment given by Dr. Muhammad Rashid and his wife Dr. Fatema Rashid, the Engineering department is able to support and award students for their hard work in their two-semester capstone projects that integrate knowledge acquired throughout their degree.


Spring 2019 First Place

2019 IEEE SoutheastCon Hardware Competition
Team Members 
Andrew Petrovsky, Michael Wagner, Dustin Williams
Faculty Mentor
Dr. Andreas Fuchs
Abstract
Space debris, and the threat it poses to current and future exploration is the theme for the IEEE SoutheastCon 2019 Hardware Competition. The goal of this project is to design and build an autonomous robot that will traverse an orbital field and remove debris from the orbital path while avoiding specific obstacles. The robot is divided into three subsystems: locomotion, navigation, and debris capture. The locomotion subsystem employs motors with encoders controlled via a microcontroller to perform precise movements. Navigation is based around a scanning LiDAR sensor coupled with Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) algorithms which enable the robot to map its environment and orient itself in real time. Debris capture is accomplished mostly through behavior, with a recessed skid plate that can accumulate objects as exhaustive searches of the field are made.


 

Fall 2018 First Place

Machine Head Functionality Testing Station
Team Members 
Kelly Flack and Conner McCreless
Faculty Advisor
Dr. Bhuvana Ramachandran
Abstract
The project involves the design of a testing station to be incorporated into the production line of the GE 2.X Machine Head. The testing station is capable of delivering power to the Machine Head without many intermittent steps and allows the testers on the production line to be closer to the unit for faster routing of connections and quick emergency stop if a problem arises. The project was a collaboration with GE Renewable Energy in Pensacola.

 

Second Place

IHMC Underwater Data Collection
Team Members
Andre Serafim, Murilo Basso, Harrison Payne, and Joseph Timbang
Faculty Advisor
Dr. Yazan Alqudah
Abstract
The project is an underwater data collection device overseen by IHMC. The purpose of the device is to use a blue laser as a medium for data transfer such that temperature, imaging, current, and so on. The data can potentially be received from artificial reefs and recorded without any manual effort. Such a device has only been somewhat completed (in the sense that the project had a different goal, but similar application) once at MIT under an essentially limitless budget. One of the goals for this device was to recreate MIT’s success on a significantly scaled budget. As such, research was made into methodology on how to model such a system.


Spring 2018 First Place

Design of a Fully-Autonomous Robot Platform
Team Members
Asma Al-Selwadi, Steven Lewis, Oanh Nguyen
Faculty Advisor
Dr. Mohamed Khabou
Abstract
The IEEE Southeastcon Hardware Competition dictates that a fully-autonomous robot platform will be simulating the role of a pirate with the purpose of reading a treasure map and successfully completing its journey to retrieve the treasure chest. The robot will initially be placed onto its “pirate ship” where it will receive an IR signal that determines the path that the robot must follow. At various points of the path, the robot will have mechanical tasks, such as pushing a button, applying pressure to a pad, raising a flag, and finally lifting and storing the “treasure chest” and bringing it back to the ship.

Second Place

Design of a Wall Painting Robot
Team Members
Christopher DeLauder, Andrew Jones, Stephen Proud, Sam Cobb, Jacob Rea, Kayla Riley
Faculty Advisor
Mr. Richard Landry
Abstract
The capstone team designed an interior wall painting robot. The robot was built to a ½ scale and was able to paint a ½ scale mock-up room with walls 4 feet in height and 8 feet in width. The wall painting robot consists of a mobile robot base equipped with a painting mechanism and paint sprayer. The project assumes basic preparations will be completed beforehand, such as the moving of furniture to the center of the room, the masking of trim and the laying down of appropriate drop cloths.


Fall 2017 First Place

Design of a Fully Autonomous System with a
User-interface Web Platform

Team Members
Everette Petsinger, Taylor Whalen, Kathryn Torre, Winston Riley, Adam Mooers
Faculty Advisor
Dr. Mohamed Khabou
Abstract
The intended goal of this project is to design, build, and test a fully autonomous system with a user-interface web platform. The automated system incorporates all systems required for self-driving including braking, steering, and acceleration. Braking and steering are electromechanically controlled with actuators connected to a real-time management system. There is a GPS system for navigation along a pre-planned route. C.A.R.T., short for Computerized Autonomous Robotic Transportation, aims to provide a more convenient transportation option for urban commuters. Commuters can request and manage rides through a complimentary mobile web app. This project is intended to prevent DUI’s, allow safe travel for handicapped users, and provide personalized transportation routes for busy city travel.

2nd Place

Design of an Autonomous Lawn Mower
Team Members
Kyle Chisum, Evan DeBusk, Corey Stinar, Devin Wisdom
Faculty Advisor
Dr. A. Fuchs
Abstract
The goal of this project is to reduce the annual number of mower blade injuries while minimizing the physical stress required to mow a lawn for at-risk health populations. Along with safety, we believe that there is room for improvement in both quality and price based on comparable autonomous lawn mowers on the market today. To accomplish this goal, a fully autonomous lawn mower capable of navigating a lawn purely with GPS coordinates, derived from an RTK unit, which can maintain safety through multiple sensors was produced.


Spring 2017 First Place

Design of a Remotely Operated Power Line Inspection Tool
Team Members
Bryce Hagar, Wydrick Hill, Sean Miller, Ruben Ramirez, and John Wimberly
Faculty Advisor
Dr. Mohamed Khabou
Abstract
Inspecting power lines for quality and remaining lifespan is time-consuming and costly for power companies worldwide, but this action is imperative for safety and preventing outages. The design of a robot to traverse distribution lines allows a remote operator to conduct a detailed inspection on miles of lines – all from a secure location. With the ability to easily mount this robot and record video from both sides of the line, power companies will be able to provide their lineman a safer working environment and their customers a greater power reliability and reduced costs.

Second Place

Design of a Smart HVAC Control System
Team Members
David Shearlock and Jonathan Nix
Faculty Advisor
Dr. Bhuvana Ramachandran
Abstract
The modern heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC ) systems usually rely on a temperature measurement from a single location to control an entire building, or at least a large portion or zone of the building. More precise control of the system is required to improve user comfort and potentially reduce the power demands of HVAC systems. By designing a smarter control unit capable of utilizing an array of temperature and humidity sensors, the control unit directs valves to regulate air flow into or away from a zone thereby increasing personal comfort and reducing unneeded air conditioning to areas where the desired conditions have already been met. This project utilizes a Raspberry Pi microcontroller to receive data from the temperature sensors and relay commands to servo-controlled in-duct dampers, as well as stepper motor controller vent registers. The system was tested inside a multi-room demo home and was shown to provide an evener temperature distribution compared to the traditional single sensor/control system.