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Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series

The Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series fosters dialogue about First Amendment issues and is made possible by a generous gift from the Jane G. and Fred K. Seligman Endowment.


About the Series

Since its inception in 2009, the Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series has fostered dialogue about First Amendment issues by uniting the University and local community in meaningful conversation. We aim not only to promote a robust discussion, but, like the freedoms protected in the United States, we hope this opportunity for free discussion will also promote understanding and friendship among our fellow citizens.

This lecture series is made possible by a generous gift from the Jane G. and Fred K. Seligman Endowment. As a Jewish émigré from Nazi Germany in 1934, Fred Seligman cherished the freedoms protected by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. Having experienced the challenges of a nation at war, Fred Seligman understood the dilemmas that nations like the United States face in protecting these freedoms. While conscious that our liberties are always fragile, Mr. Seligman believed that the continued protection of freedom requires strong institutions of government respected by its citizens. The hope of the Seligman family is that this series will foster a deeper discussion among the community, faculty and students; particularly as the students prepare to lead in a world in which they may have to discern what is right and just. 


This year, the 2019 Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series hosted three different events focusing on First Amendment rights and freedom of speech. 

Them Damned Pictures: A History of Editorial Cartoons

August 23 - September 15
Pensacola Museum of Art

This exhibition examined editorial cartoons from the past and present. The show aimed to open a public dialogue on important issues surrounding the First Amendment and freedom of speech. On view was a selection of work by Andy Marlette that critiqued local, regional and national issues, as well as works by Earle Bowden and Ralph Dunagin. 

Banned and Forbidden – Prohibited Musical Masterpieces

Thursday, September 12
12-1 p.m., Old Christ Church

Under the direction of UWF music professor, Dr. Leonid Yanovskiy, "Banned and Forbidden - Prohibited Musical Masterpieces" featured Music Department chair Dr. Sheila Dunn; Music Department assistant professor, director of collaborative piano, Blake Riley; and cellist Jordan Galvarino along with historical notes presented by Dr. Daniel Miller of the Department of History and Dr. Victoria Adamenko, musicologist.

An Evening with Carl Hiaasen

Thursday, September 12
6-7:15 p.m., New World Landing

The University of West Florida welcomed noted author and columnist, Carl Hiaasen, as part of our Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series to discuss his life, career and the exercise of free speech in the modern world.