SPECIAL EDITION

UWF WRITING LAB

 

GREETINGS AND SALUTATIONS FORMS OF ADDRESS
ADDRESSEE FORM OF ADDRESS SALUTATION
Clerical and Religious Officials
Clergy The Reverend Dr. Michael Johnson Dear Sir: or
Dear Rev. Johnson: or
Dear Dr. Johnson:

 

Priest The Reverend Tom Bonanti
or
The Reverend Tom Bonanti
Dear Father Bonanti: 
or
Dear Father:

 

Rabbi Rabbi David Ostrich Dear Rabbi Ostrich:
College University Officials
Dean Dean Wesley Little
or
Dr. Wesley Little
Dean
Dear Dean Little:
or
Dear Dr. Little:
President President John  Cavanaugh
or
Dr. John Cavanaugh
Dear President Cavanaugh:
or
Dear Dr. Cavanaugh:
Professor Dr. Lowe-Evans
or
Professor Lowe-Evans
Dear Dr. Lowe-Evans:
or
Dear Professor Lowe-Evans:
Federal, State, and Local Government Officials
City Councilman The Honorable Ronald Townsend Dear Mr. Townsend:
Commissioner The Honorable Marie Young
Board of County Commissioners
Dear Mrs. Young:
Judge The Honorable Nancy Gilliam Dear Judge Gilliam:
Governor The Honorable Jeb Bush
Governor of Florida
Dear Governor Bush:
School Board Member Dr. Elmer Jenkins
Escambia County County School Board
Dear Dr. Jenkins:
School Superintendent Mr. Jim Paul Dear Mr. Paul:
Representative The Honorable Jeff Miller Dear Mr. Miller:
Mayor The Honorable John Fogg Dear Mayor Fogg:
President The President Dr. Mr. President:
Military
Admiral RADM David L. Brewer Dear Admiral Brewer:
Commander Commander Nathaniel Wu Dear Commander Wu:
Private Private Ken Freeman
U.S. Army
Dear Private Freeman:
Other Professional Titles
Attorney Cynthia Williams
Attorney-at-Law
or
Cynthia Williams, Esq.
Dear Ms. Williams:
or
Dear Attorney Williams:
Dentist Marcus Paul, D.D.S.
or
Dr. Marcus Paul
Dear Dr. Paul:
Physician Percy Goodman, M.D.
or
Dr. Percy Goodman
Dear Dr. Goodman:
Veterinarian Marclyn Sims, D.V.M.
or
Dr. Marclyn Sims
Dear Dr. Sims:

 


Proofreading Tip: Check any sequence of numbers of letters, especially on successive pages.
• page numbers 
• lettered lists
• tables and figures
• number sections and subsections
• numbered footnotes or endnotes
• alphabetized lists, such as
bibliographies

 

 

 

STATE ABBREVIATIONS
Standard Two-Letter Abbreviations for Addressing Envelopes

AL Alabama MT Montana
AK Alaska NE Nebraska
AZ Arizona NV Nevada
AR Arkansas NH New Hampshire
CA California NJ New Jersey
CO Colorado NM New Mexico
CT Connecticut NY New York
DE Delaware NC North Carolina
DC District of Columbia ND North Dakota
FL Florida OH Ohio
GA Georgia OK Oklahoma
HI Hawaii OR Oregon
ID Idaho PA Pennsylvania
IL Illinois PR Puerto Rico
IN Indiana RI Rhode Island
IA Iowa SC South Carolina
KS Kansa SD South Dakota
KY Kentucky TN Tennessee
LA Louisiana TX Texas
ME Maine UT Utah
MD Maryland VT Vermont
MA Massachusetts VA Virginia
MI Michigan WA Washington
MN Minnesota WV West Virginia
MS Mississippi WI Wisconsin
MO Missouri WY Wyoming

 

Avoid "Weasel" Words or Phrases
generally speaking as has been suggested
to be sure customarily
it appears (or it seems) in keeping with company policy
normally as you can see
apparently as might be expected
supposedly is considered (or thought) to
possibly for the most part

 

Commonly
Mispronounced Words
in-cen-tive

NOT

in-cen-i-tive
real-tor NOT real-a-tor
often (of-en) NOT oft-tin
fiscal year NOT physical year
clique (click) NOT cliché
ten-ta-tive NOT ten-a-tive
sim-i-lar NOT sim-u-lar
mis-chie-vous  NOT mis-chee-vee-ous
li-brary NOT li-berry

 

USING CAPITAL LETTERS

The following aren't just generic nouns. They are trademarks and thus should be capitalized. Check any standard dictionary if you're unsure about whether a word is a trademark.

Apple computers Liquid Paper correction fluid
Band-Aid adhesives Styrofoam disposable cups & plates
Bic ink pens Realtor real estate broker
Kleenex facial tissues Rolodex card file
Magic Marker felt tip pens Velcro fasteners
Jeep vehicle Tupperware plastic containers

 

How's Your Business English?

•What's wrong with this sentence? 
     You must register and attend the conference.
•Which of the following words is misspelled?
     1. alot 
     2. all right
     3. two dollars apiece
•Which of the following expressions is grammatically correct?
     1. I feel badly about. . . . 
     2. I feel bad about . . . .


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