Earth and Environmental Sciences

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Earth and Environmental Sciences students will find excellent opportunities to explore contemporary environmental issues and participate in scientific research with departmental faculty; whether in excellent facilities or in the current Gulf Coast environmental field laboratories.


A Glance at the Program

  • Consists of a multidisciplinary approach that combines natural science and research management
  • Students learn to analyze physical and socio-economic environments and to reach decisions concerning environmental use and management
  • Offers a core curriculum that is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in the earth and environmental sciences, as well as in the modern methods and techniques used by scientists and environmental professionals 
  • Techniques include cartography, remote sensing, geographic information systems (GIS), spatial statistics, and environmental sampling and surveying 
  • Classes generally host 25-35 students, while labs consist of 15-20 students.

Department News

The department has joined with the Bream Fishermen Association to launch the Environmental Water Sampling Academy, a new citizen science initiative that will provide professional development opportunities to UWF students interested in regional water quality. Learn more about the EWSA.


Water sampling demonstration with the bream Fisherman association

MS student Peter Tereszkiewicz and Dr. Phillip Schmutz install a wind velocity sampling station on the UWF property of Pensacola Beach.

Research Spotlight

In preparation of the 2014 hurricane season the UWF beach property was surveyed to better understand the baseline morphology. In addition to the establishment of 314 transect lines, a coastal research grid, started in 1978 by Dr. James P. Morgan was re-established. Documentation of Morgan’s grid extends from 1978 through 1992; during this time an immense amount of profile and sediment data was attained. It is the intent of the new grid to begin where records left off, and facilitate continuing education and coastal research. Each semester six survey days are selected to collect geodata, sediment samples, and most recently attain wind velocities along a vertical transect. In this photo, MS student Peter Tereszkiewicz and Dr. Phillip Schmutz install a wind velocity sampling station on the UWF property of Pensacola Beach.