Clifton,Kari_211

Dr. Kari Clifton

Biography:

Dr. Kari B. Clifton, a Lecturer in Biology, has a Ph.D. in Veterinary Medical Science from the University of Florida, where her work centered on mechanical properties and testing of bone. She has worked as a scientist in different fields for more than 25 years. Some of her latest research focused on pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, the association between serum relaxin and subsequent shoulder instability, and factors affecting bone repair.

Clifton held two postdoctoral fellowships after earning her Ph.D., which focused on skeletal biomechanics of the Florida manatee. At Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, she examined the role of insulin-like growth factors in regulating bone mass. At the University of Connecticut Health Center’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, she focused on the role of Wnt5a in regulating canonical Wnt signaling pathway in cartilage development and repair.

She also is experienced in cell and molecular biology techniques, in vivo work with rodents, histology, and mechanical and materials engineering. Prior to her Ph.D. and postdoctoral studies Clifton worked as a marine mammal biologist for the State of Florida, gaining experience with experimental design; univariate, multivariate, and nonparametric statistics. Her work has been published in Journal of Orthopedic Trauma, Journal of Orthopedic Research, Endocrinology, Biogerontology and other publications.

Degrees & Institutions:

Ph.D. Veterinary Medical Science, University of Florida

Research:

Some of her latest research focused on pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, the association between serum relaxin and subsequent shoulder instability, and factors affecting bone repair.

Publications:

    Her work has been published in Journal of Orthopedic Trauma, Journal of Orthopedic Research, Endocrinology, Biogerontology and other publications.


Keywords: bones’ mechanical properties, serum relaxin, bone repair, relaxin receptors, manatee’s skeletal biomechanics, bone mass growth factors, Wnt5A, cartilage development, marine mammal biology

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