Abstract

This research investigated the effects of cognitive failure on workplace safety and accidents over 2 studies. 

It was hypothesized that cognitive failure would directly predict safety behavior and workplace accidents

and predict those outcomes over and above conscientiousness.  It was found that cognitive failure uniquely

accounted for workplace safety behavior and accidents.  However, it has been suggested by researchers that

certain individual differences might interact to produce differential effects.  Thus, a mediated model was

tested examining the interaction of cognitive failure and conscientiousness.  It was found that cognitive

failure moderated the relationship between conscientiousness and accidents and unsafe behavior, especially

when conscientiousness is low.