Abstract

This paper addresses the concerns associated with Internet-based instruction, noted anecdotally, by investigators in the literature. The authors summarize the findings of recent studies in higher education that have raised issues with this emerging pedagogical technology. Empirical investigations on the impact of using the Internet for teaching are rather sparse and equivocal, offering only partial support for the many potential drawbacks (e.g., lack of faculty training, time constraints, technical problems) discussed by researchers. Further, most empirical studies have found a range of positive as well as negative findings. The authors stress that obstacles to teaching via the Internet can be categorized as either institutional, instructional, technical, or personal, and that specific reservations about employing this technology may be closely related to the type (and degree) of technological use.