Abstract

The present study examined the "unique" contributions of attributional complexity and causal dimension (stability, internality) scores in the prediction of boredom proneness. A group of 214 undergraduate students completed the Boredom Proneness, Attributional Complexity, and Causal Dimension scales. As hypothesized, both attributional complexity and causal dimension scores were significant predictors of boredom proneness. Boredom proneness was found to be associated with lower attributional complexity scores and more stable attributions. It was also found that high boredom proneness scores were associated with internal attributions for boredom. Results of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that after attributional complexity and the causal dimensions were entered first into the equation, the effects of gender did not make a significant contribution to the prediction of boredom proneness. Implications for previously found gender differences and attributional retraining are discussed.