Ethics in I-O Psychology

Spring 2014


 

Instructor: Dr. Stephen Vodanovich

Office:  Building 41, Room 220; Lab Room 225

Office Hours: MW 10:00-11:00; 2:30-3:30. Other times are available by appointment.

Text: Lowman, R. L. (2006).  The ethical practice of psychology in organizations. American Psychological

Association: Washington, DC.

 


 

~ Student Learning Objectives ~

 

Students will be able to:

 

1)  Develop and give presentations on contemporary, important ethical topics in the field of I/O Psychology.

[Primarily assessed via a presenation/debate] Relevant core areas: Content, Critical thinking, Communication, Project management

 

2)  Summarize and evaluate the array of ethical issues covered in the course.

[Primarily assessed via a presenation/debate, class discussion/participation] Content, Critical thinking, Communication

 

3)  Discuss and evaluate case studies in terms of adherence to professional guidelines (e.g., APA)

[Primarily assessed via a presenation/debate, class discussion/participation] Content, Critical thinking, Communication

 

4)  Evaluate, in detail, the impact of ethical issues for individuals, organizations, and society.

[Primarily assessed via a presenation/debate, class discussion/participation] Content, Critical thinking, Communication

 

5)  Logically summarize a given perspective on an ethical issue and identify the strengths and weaknesses of contrary positions.

[Primarily assessed via a presenation/debate, class discussion/participation] Content, Critical thinking, Communication

 

 


~ Approximate Timeline ~
Date
Topic
Presenter
1/6

Introduction/Overview

>>>  APA Ethical Principles  of Psychologists and Code of Conduct  ||  html version   ||  .pdf version

 

-----

1/13

Reporting of Test Results

 

 

Steve Vodanovich

PowerPoint Slides

1/20
No Class --- Martin Luther King Day
1/27

Genetic Testing

MacDonald, C., & Williams-Jones, B.  (2002).  Ethics and genetics: Susceptibility testing in the workplace. Journal of Business Ethics, 35, 235-241.  Link

 

Michael Corelli

2/3

Personnel Selection

Lowman cases:

2 [Validation Efforts with Small Sample Sizes]
3 [Test Validation Strategies]

 

Sijia Li

2/10

Personnel Selection

Lowman cases:

Personnel Screening for Emotional Stability

Developing International Selection Systems

 

Char'Lee Tubbs

2/17

Personnel Selection

Lowman cases:

11 [Assessment Center Records]
12 [Maintaining Confidentiality and Objectivity]

 

Erin Delle

2/24

Organizational Diagnosis and Intervention

Lowman cases:

14 [Layoff Notifications]

15 [Survey Reveals Sexual Harassment]

 

Valentina Fontaine

3/3

Maintaining Confidentiality

Lowman cases: 

18 [Confidentiality and survey reporting]

20 [Conflicting obligations in survey research]

23 [Confidentiality of interview data]

 

Matthew Kanuck and

Tasha Lesher

3/10
No Class (Spring Break) 
 
3/17

Organizational Diagnosis and Intervention

Lowman cases:

26 [Sharing of Management Development Results]
27 [Disposition of Psychological Reports]

 

William Howard

3/24

 

Managing Consulting Relationships

Lowman cases:

28 [Conflict of interests and roles]

29 [Accurately Reporting Research Results]

 

 

Sean Crawford

 

 

 

 

 

3/31

Managing Consulting Relationships

Lowman cases:

32 [Dual relationships]

33 [Pressures to Implement Psychological Programs Too Soon]

 

Stormy Speaks

 

 

 

 

4/7

Ethics of Professional Behavior

Lowman cases:

57 [Evaluating Colleagues' Competencies]
58 [Confronting Unethical Behavior]

 

Sadie O'Neill

4/14

Ethics of Professional Behavior

Lowman cases:

52 [ Responding to Allegations of Misconduct]
53 [The Ethics of Voluntary Professional Activities]

 

Ryan Sunwall

4/21

Drug Testing

Crandford, M. (1998).  Drug testing and the right to privacy: Arguing the ethics of workplace drug testing. Journal of Business Ethics, 17 (16), 1805-1815.   Link

Ryan Bird

 

Some Important Links:

Student Disability Services
Student Grievence Process

 

~ Responsibilities and Grading Criteria ~

 

       additional outside readings) and to lead a discussion on the assigned topic. Those not presenting are responsible

       for reading any assigned material and to be active in the discussion of issues. 

 

         (Presentation rubric)

 

        in the final grade