Web and CMS Resources

General web and specific CMS resources used for managing the UWF web presence. Please contact Web Services if you would like to request any additional items to be added to this list.


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Tips and Tricks

How to Back Up Files
  1. Select and copy all of the files and folders within your departmental web directory (Web drive).
  2. Create a new folder on your departmental Home drive and label it “Website Copy 2013.”
  3. Paste all of the files and folders that you copied from your web directory into the newly created folder. You now have an offline copy of everything that is currently in your web directory.
How to Clean Out a Web Directory

Every UWF website is contained within a web directory (ArgoNet account web drive). Any files, documents and/or images stored within a web directory are accessible via the Internet. Thus, it is important to only store your live/active website within the departmental web directories that you manage. Cleaning out your departmental web directory is particularly important as the university moves toward a Content Management System (CMS). Some portions of the migration to CMS may be automated. When this automation occurs, we only want the software to migrate current/active websites and web content.

University web directories should only contain the current files, documents and images that actively comprise your departmental website. Old files should be removed and/or archived offline. Below are step-by-step instructions for cleaning out a web directory.

STEP 1: Select and copy all of the files and folders within your departmental web directory (Web drive). Create a new folder on your departmental Home drive and label it “Website Copy 2013.” Paste all of the files and folders that you copied from your web directory into the newly created folder. You now have an offline copy of everything that is currently in your web directory.

STEP 2: Familiarize yourself with your live departmental website and its back-end structure and hierarchy within the web directory. Begin to identify files and folders that are no longer being linked to by your live website. Delete these inactive files/folders from the web directory (remember you have a copy on your Home drive if you accidentally delete something that is active). Review image files and delete those that are not being used or linked to on your live website. Review PDFs, Word docs, Excel docs, etc. and delete those that are not being used or linked to on your live website. Delete any archived or old versions of the departmental website that are still being stored within the web directory. You may keep the “dev” folder if you use it for testing purposes when making updates to your site.

STEP 3: While completing STEP 2, frequently go online via a web browser and check each page of your departmental website to ensure the site is functioning properly and there are no broken links or images. If you accidentally delete a file that is active on your website, simply copy it out of the Home drive folder you created in STEP 1 and paste it back into your web directory.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact Assistant Director for Web Services Jay Massey at Ext. 2427 or e-mail jmassey@uwf.edu.

Organizing Documents

Within your departmental web directory, organize files and documents using a folder structure. At a minimum if your site is small (less than 15 pages), your directory should have an “images” folder containing all graphics and photo files. In this scenario, all .cfm web files stay on the top level of the directory. If your site is large (more than 15 pages), use folders to organize groups of pages, images and documents (such as PDFs).

When creating new folders, keep in mind the URL string. Short, meaningful, one-word folder names will make for more appealing URLs. Regardless of the size of your site, keep in mind that as you rename and create files and folders you may need to update the links on your navigation bar and in your content in order to avoid broken paths.

File and Folder Naming

When naming any file or folder, always use a meaningful and brief label. Be consistent in the naming conventions you follow. Avoid using spaces in file and folder names. Avoid using lengthy phrases or document titles. Avoid punctuation marks or other illegal characters. In general, try to use all lower case letters for consistency. Use dashes to separate words in files and folder names.

  • Example #1 (PDF Naming)
    • Bad: Biography of John Smith October 29, 2012.pdf
    • Best: john-smith-bio-2012.pdf
  • Example #2 (Image Naming)
    • Bad: IMG00212.jpg
    • Best: judy-bense.jpg
  • Example #3 (Folder Naming)
    • Bad: Marketing Staff Members
    • Best: staff
  • Example #4 (File Naming)
    • Bad: glc.cfm
    • Best: greek-leadership-course.cfm
  • Example #5 (Document List Management Naming - Special)
    • Bad: president's speech-Nov2913.pdf
    • Best: PresSpeech-20131129-Town_Hall_Meeting.pdf
    • Note: This special naming convention is used to parse and display a list of documents within a directory with titles and links in chronological or alpha/numeric order
Cutting Out Click Here

Avoid using the label “click here” when creating and reviewing hyperlinks on your web pages. Use clear, meaningful and specific link labels that convey exactly what the user is clicking toward. By using meaningful link labels, your site will be better optimized for search engines and the user experience will be improved. Additionally, automatic migration of your site into the CMS will benefit from implementing this simple best practice technique.

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