Program Requirements

To graduate as a Kugelman Honors Scholar, each student in the program completes Honors coursework and an Honors thesis, performs community service, and maintains a 3.25 undergraduate GPA.


First Year

Honors Core I

Honors Core I is the foundational course of the Honors experience. Dr. Greg Lanier, Dean of University College and Director of the Kugelman Honors Program, teaches Core I. Honors Core I examines the concept of leadership through literature. All incoming first year Honors students take the course together and are assigned a Mentor to help guide them through the semester. 

Honors Core II

Honors Core II is the second and final course in the Honors Core sequence. All first year Honors students take the course in the spring semester of their first year. Dr. Jocelyn EvansAssociate Dean of the College of Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities and Professor in the Department of Government, teaches Core II, which examines the concept of self in the community.

Students are assigned a Mentor to help guide them through the classroom and field project experiences in Core II.

 

Second Year to Graduation

Honors Electives

Honors students must complete four (4) Honors Electives before they graduate. Honors Electives can consist of three different types of courses:

Honors General Education Courses

  • Each semester, the Honors program offers several sections of General Education courses. The offerings vary from semester to semester. Students are able to take Honors sections of General Education courses in their first year. All other Honors coursework is to be taken after the completion of the Honors Core sequence. 

Additional Honors Seminars

  • If a student wishes (and their degree program requirements allow), they can take additional Honors Seminars beyond the two (2) required, which can serve as Honors Electives. See below for more information about Honors Seminars.

Honors by Contract Courses

  • Students can make any 3000- or 4000-level course an Honors by Contract course with the consent and assistance of the instructor. Students coordinate with the instructor and agree on an enhancement to the coursework that will make the course an Honors experience. This is an excellent way for students to delve deeper into subjects that interest them and/or their major. Non-Honors study abroad and service experiences can also be adapted into Honors by Contract courses with the approval of Honors staff.
Honors Seminars

Honors students must complete two (2) Honors seminars before they graduate. Honors seminars are are interdisciplinary courses that professors from a variety of departments create and teach exclusively for the Honors program. Honors Seminars are limited to 15 students each. Seminars are offered each fall and spring, and topics vary.

Past popular seminar topics include Politics of Food, From Wastelands to Wetlands, Metalaw: Ecology & Justice in the Planetary Era, Zombies & Survival, Cancer: Scientific Research and Social Impacts, Conjunctive Psychology, Science of Brewing, and Tolkien: Text & Film.

Honors Thesis Research Methods Course

Honors Thesis Research Methods is a 1 s.h. course that is offered each spring semester. This course helps students understand the thesis-writing process and covers the basic research methodologies required to begin a thesis project.

The class is conducted as a collaborative, hands-on workshop and covers important areas such as choosing a topic, approaching an advisor, scholarly research methods, time management, and thesis presentation requirements. 

Honors Thesis & Presentation

Honors students can take up to 3 s.h. of thesis credits while completing their Honors thesis under the guidance of a thesis advisor. The Honors thesis is intended to be a capstone project for students and can assume a variety of forms depending on a student's major. For students in majors requiring capstone projects as part of their degree program, enhancements to such existing requirements can be negotiated so that Honors students are not completing double theses or capstone projects, but are instead further developing the culminating work in their major.

As the final requirement of the Honors programs, Honors students are required to formally present their thesis research or creative activity. Students are encouraged to apply to present at any of the three Honors conferences that the program annually attends (the Florida Collegiate Honors Council, Southern Regional Honors Council, and the National Collegiate Honors Council), or at the Student Scholars Symposium held each spring at UWF.

 

Community Service

Community Service Requirement

Before graduating, Honors students are required to complete 100 hours of community service logged in JasonQuest. JasonQuest is a resource through which students can also discover volunteer, internship, and job opportunities.

Students are able to complete independent community service or participate in projects through the university and/or group service projects that the Honors Council Service Committee organizes.

 

GPA Requirement

Minimum Grade Point Average

All students in the Kugelman Honors Program must maintain a 3.25 G.P.A. at UWF.

Failure to meet this requirement will result in being placed on probation in the Honors Program. If an Honors student fails to achieve a 3.25 G.P.A. for two consecutive semesters, the student will become academically ineligible to be a member of the Honors Program. Students who do not complete an Honors course for two consecutive semesters (not including summer semesters) will be terminated for non-participation.

Students who have become academically ineligible can apply for reinstatement to the Kugelman Honors Program once their G.P.A. exceeds 3.25 by submitting a petition for reinstatement to the Honors Director. 

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