University of West Florida
 Faculty Homepage for John Worth

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Teaching and Advisement

This page includes information relating to my teaching and advisement for both undergraduate and graduate students, as outlined below:

Teaching

Advisement

Classes


General Teaching Notes

In general, apart from my teaching schedule and individual course syllabi (below), I have developed the following resources for students at all levels:

As a general rule, student success in my classes will be determined by: (1) attending class (including paying attention, and participating when appropriate), (2) reading ALL assigned material carefully by the due date, (3) completing all assignments in a careful and timely manner, and (4) communicating promptly with me or the teaching assistant regarding any content, grading, or attendance issues.  Good study habits and time management skills are also pivotal, since they can make or break student grades, regardless of capability.  Additionally, students should also avail themselves of extra credit opportunities whenever they are offered, since this sometimes makes the difference in final grades, especially in borderline cases.

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Graduate Student Admissions

Students interested in applying to UWF for graduate studies in the Department of Anthropology should begin at the Graduate Admissions Overview page of the UWF Graduate School, where they will find the basic information about how to apply for graduate studies at UWF.

Department-specific information regarding admission to Anthropology Master's degree program is available at the Anthropology MA page for the Graduate Catalog.

Which specialization should I choose?

The UWF Anthropology Department offers master's degrees following two specializations or "tracks": General Anthropology and Historical Archaeology.  The difference between the two specializations is basically one of emphasis.  Each track has five required graduate classes (one common to both, the rest distinct, as shown below) and several additional elective classes in required areas (an additional cultural, biological, and archaeological electives in Anthropology for the General Track, and History electives for the Historical Archaeology track), along with several open electives.  Full details can be found in the Anthropology Department listing within the current UWF Catalog, but the table below provides a quick comparison, as well as unofficial graduate program planners that may be downloaded for individual planning purposes and advising sessions.

General Anthropology M.A. Historical Archaeology M.A.
  ANG 6110: Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology   ANG 6110: Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology
  ANG 6286: Contemporary Cultural Anth. Theory   ANG 5172: Historic Archaeology Seminar
  ANG 6583: Evolutionary Theory in Biological Anth.   ANG 5173: Historical Research Methods in Archaeology
  ANG 6093: Research Design in Anthropology   ANG 6196: Pol., Pract., and Arch. in Hist. Preservation
  ANG 6002: Proseminar in Anthropology   ANG 6824: Advanced Archaeological Field Methods
  + 3 Anthropology electives, one in each subfield   + 3 History electives
  + 3 unspecified electives   + 3 unspecified electives
  ANG 6971: Thesis Research (3+ hours)   ANG 6971: Thesis Research (3+ hours)

Students who want a stronger focus on history and documents as part of their historical archaeology studies should enroll for the Historical Archaeology track, while students who prefer to take a more diverse range of anthropological classes should enroll for the General Anthropology track.  We have students doing historical archaeology thesis projects in both tracks, so it is mostly a difference in coursework.  For a list of history courses available at UWF (as well as current course offerings), see the links below, and also my General Student Links

Historical Archaeology track graduate students should also make note of the fact that Florida participates in the Academic Common Market, a program of the Southern Regional Education Board in which students from other participating states can have out-of-state tuition waived if there are no graduate degree programs in their chosen field within their home state.  Since the Historical Archaeology specialization is relatively uncommon in Master's programs, UWF students have the opportunity to avail themselves of this program.  Details on this program can be found here and here.

What is the application process?

The following items are required in order to apply for graduate studies in Anthropology.  Note that ALL items must now be submitted directly to the UWF Graduate School, and should NOT be submitted directly to the Anthropology Department:

Required by UWF Graduate School:
   Online Application (submitted online through the Graduate Admissions page; $30 processing fee)
   Undergraduate Transcripts
   Graduate Admission Test Scores (usually GRE)
 
Required by UWF Department of Anthropology:
   Statement of Intent
   Writing Sample
   Three (3) Letters of Academic Reference (must be received directly from the referee)

In general, your statement of intent should give the department a sense of what your interests and anticipated career path is, because that will help us evaluate the extent to which our program (including current faculty specialties and projects) is a good match for you.  You should also provide an overview of your previous training and experience in archaeology, particularly focusing on your academic background in the field, though you can of course also cover any subsequent relevant job experience (for example archaeological work in the CRM field).  This can provide you an opportunity to summarize or explain briefly some of the facts and figures provided elsewhere on your more detailed transcript(s) and test score reports.

Your writing sample can be a term paper from a previous class, or a presented or published paper, and is used by the department to assess your writing skills.  Writing samples submitted are normally based on anthropological topics, but may also include other appropriate disciplines as long as they offer a basis for evaluating the quality of your writing.

Your recommendations should be strongly weighted toward academic faculty members who can speak to your performance as a student, and it's best if most (or even better all) are anthropologists/archaeologists, though of course if you choose, you can also include faculty from other disciplines, or non-academic job supervisors or field school directors, etc. (but these should  not constitute the bulk of your recommendations).  To the extent that you have non-academic anthropologists/archaeologists among your recommendations, or professors from other disciplines, you should probably address and explain this directly in your statement of intent or cover letter.

Do I need an undergraduate degree in anthropology?

A bachelor's degree in anthropology is preferred, but not the only route to admission to the UWF graduate program in anthropology.  All incoming students, including those with an anthropology BA or BS, must have completed a minimum set of prerequisite courses, and students lacking one or more may be required to complete them prior to full admission to the graduate program at UWF (conditional admittance is possible while prerequisites are completed).  All students in both tracks must have completed at least one upper division (300/3000-400/4000 level) course in both archaeology and cultural anthropology.  Additional requirements for each track are detailed below:

  • For the General Anthropology track, an upper division course in both biological anthropology and anthropological theory is required in addition to those in archaeology and cultural anthropology. 

  • For the Historical Archaeology track, students must have completed Biological Anthropology including Lab (ANT 2511/2511L or its equivalent), as well as Principles of Archaeology (ANT 3101 or its equivalent), and they must also have completed an undergraduate archaeological field school in the area of anticipated specialty (terrestrial or maritime) of sufficient length and appropriately comparable content to prepare them to act as field supervisors during their graduate field school at UWF (ANG 6824).  Incoming graduate students at UWF commonly take the 10-week undergraduate field school (ANT 4824 or 4121) during their first summer as a prerequisite for the supervisory graduate field school during their second summer semester.

What about funding opportunities?

The Division of Anthropology and Archaeology makes determinations for several funding opportunities for incoming graduate students shortly following the February 15 deadline for annual applications to the program.  All but one of these awards are determined based on the regular graduate application materials, and thus no separate application is required.  However, one assistantship does requires that a separate and additional letter of interest be submitted along with the original application to the Department, and that is the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) assistantship, which is detailed here.

Once admitted students have begun their graduate studies, additional funding opportunities are also available, including graduate assistantship positions, as well as paid student employment through the various branches of the Division, including the Archaeology Institute, the Anthropology Department, and FPAN.  These jobs include archaeological fieldwork and labwork for both temporary and ongoing projects, as well as other positions such as visitor services at public heritage tourism facilities.  In addition, several local opportunities exist for research or travel funding for graduate students in association with thesis or other research projects. One such opportunity is provided by the UWF Scholarly and Creative Activities Committee, which offers competitive Graduate Student Research Awards (both internal UWF links) in the amount of up to $1,000 for research projects (as well as $500 additional for students who have already received a previous grant) and up to $500 for conference travel in order to present results.  Two cycles of grant applications are offered each year (fall and spring), and students may apply for one grant category each cycle.  Students may be awarded a total of up to 3 such grants during the course of their studies at UWF.  Another local funding opportunity is through the Pensacola Archaeological Society, which offers several competitive student awards for research and travel expenses.  All these funding opportunities may be pursued with the assistance of the student's thesis advisor, normally selected toward the end of the coursework phase of the graduate program (usually 2 years or less).


Graduate Course Advisement

I serve as the program director and coordinator of the Historical Archaeology specialization in the Anthropology Masters program at UWF, and help to coordinate the various facets of this degree track with students enrolled in the program at different stages of their graduate careers, particularly while they are still taking classes.  Students enrolled in the Historical Archaeology track should plan to meet with me at least once a semester, prior to registration, for a quick review of their progress within the overall program.  I can also advise graduate students in the Anthropology track as well. 

The tables below show the exact requirements for each track (see also the side-by-side comparison of the two tracks, above), and there should be one 3-credit-hour course corresponding to each of the slots by the end of  primary coursework period, for a total of 36 hours (not counting additional Thesis Research hours taken subsequently until thesis completion). For use in tracking individual progress and planning for advising sessions, students may cut and paste the tables below, or may also download and print a Historical Archaeology Program Planner or Anthropology Program Planner that I developed for this purpose.

General Anthropology M.A. Semester Year
Core    
    ANG 6110: Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology ________ ____
    ANG 6286: Contemporary Cultural Anth. Theory ________ ____
    ANG 6583: Evolutionary Theory in Biological Anth. ________ ____
    ANG 6093: Research Design in Anthropology ________ ____
    ANG 6002: Proseminar in Anthropology ________ ____
Specialty Electives    
    Specialty Elective 1/3 (Archaeology)* ________ ____
    Specialty Elective 2/3 (Biological Anthropology) ________ ____
    Specialty Elective 3/3 (Cultural Anthropology) ________ ____
General Electives*    
     Unspecified Elective 1/3 ________ ____
     Unspecified Elective 2/3 ________ ____
     Unspecified Elective 3/3 ________ ____
Thesis Hours    
     ANG 6971: Thesis Research (3+ hours) ________ ____

Historical Archaeology M.A. Semester Year
Core    
     ANG 6110: Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology ________ ____
    ANG 5172: Historic Archaeology Seminar ________ ____
    ANG 5173: Historical Research Methods in Archaeology ________ ____
    ANG 6196: Pol., Pract., and Arch. in Hist. Preservation ________ ____
     ANG 6824: Advanced Archaeological Field Methods ________ ____
Specialty Electives    
     History Elective 1/3 ________ ____
     History Elective 2/3 ________ ____
     History Elective 3/3 ________ ____
General Electives*    
     Unspecified Elective 1/3 ________ ____
     Unspecified Elective 2/3 ________ ____
     Unspecified Elective 3/3 ________ ____
Thesis Hours    
     ANG 6971: Thesis Research (3+ hours) ________ ____

*Special Note: Maritime archaeology students in both tracks need to be careful not to use up all their unspecified elective slots before taking several popular and potentially important specialty courses in this area, none of which satisfy core requirements and which are therefore always electives.  Three such courses are Nautical Archaeology Seminar (ANG 5137), Conservation of Archaeological Materials (ANT 4182C taken for graduate credit), and Ship Construction (presently ANG 5990).  All students should likewise be aware of keeping careful track of their electives so as not to end up having to take a desired elective course that will not count directly toward the degree program (if all open electives in a particular category have already been taken up with other courses).

Below are quick links for current students in the process of advisement or registration. 

Quick Advisement and Registration Links

UWF Graduate Catalog Current Course Offerings Graduate Course Descriptions
  Anthropology MA Program   Course Search   Anthropology (ANG)
      History (HIS)
Printable Graduate Program Planners Dates and Deadlines   American History (AMH)
  Anthropology   UWF Academic Calendar   European History (EUH)
  Historical Archaeology    Thesis and Dissertation Information   Latin American History (LAH)
     
Miscellaneous
  UWF Archaeological Field Schools    

For planning purposes, the anticipated schedule of core course offerings for the Historical Archaeology track during the next five academic years are shown below.  Please note that this is a proposed schedule only, and unexpected contingencies may necessitate some adjustments in this tentative plan.  Nevertheless, the anthropology department always plans carefully to ensure that all required core courses are made available to all students at least once during their course of study at UWF.   

Academic Year

2013-2014

 

2014-2015

 

2015-2016

 

2016-2017

 

2017-2018

 

Semester

Fall

Spr

Sum

Fall

Spr

Sum

Fall

Spr

Sum

Fall

Spr

Sum

Fall

Spr

Sum

ANG 6110

x

 

 

x

 

 

x

 

 

x

 

 

x

 

 

ANG 5172

 

x

 

 

 

 

 x

 

 

 

 x

 

 

 

 

ANG 5173

x

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 x

 

 

 

x

 

ANG 6196

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANG 6824

 

 

x

 

 

x

 

 

x

 

 

x

 

 

x

Finally, students who are thinking of continuing their graduate education in historical archaeology might want to consult the SHA Guide to Higher Education, which has great descriptions of graduate programs (including those offering a Ph.D.).

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Graduate Thesis Committees

During or immediately following the completion of graduate coursework, each student is expected to select a thesis advisor, who will assist in forming a thesis committee, which will work with the student to prepare a prospectus for thesis research.  Details of this process, including all forms required, are available in the Thesis Committee Process Forms document.

I presently serve on a number of graduate student committees, and will be happy to consider serving on others, although I must limit the number of committees that I chair in order to give suitable time and attention to each student.  While I most commonly work with students whose master's thesis project interests relate at least in some way to my own research interests and experience (see my Research page), or which incorporate methodologies that overlap with my areas of expertise (especially historical and ethnohistorical research as a complement to historical archaeology, either terrestrial or maritime), I am willing to participate in other student committees with more broad-ranging anthropological themes.  Nevertheless, based on past experience, I strongly encourage archaeology students to select thesis projects that relate in some direct way to the existing geographical and topical emphasis of the faculty and staff of the UWF Division of Anthropology and Archaeology, particularly emphasizing the terrestrial or maritime archaeology of the Florida panhandle region in the area around Pensacola, focusing on the prehistoric, colonial and early American periods.  Moreover, given the considerable logistical difficulties and financial challenges involved in conducting new archaeological fieldwork associated with proposed student master's thesis projects, I also encourage students to work with the substantial existing collections at UWF, which will continue to provide fodder for innovative, ground-breaking research projects for many years to come.

I chair the following student thesis committees (in alphabetical order):

I am also serving as a member of the following student committees (in alphabetical order):

Past (defended) thesis committees include the following (with links to online PDFs when available):

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Current Classes

Fall 2014

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 3101

Principles of Anthropology (syllabus)

T Th 9:30 - 10:45 AM
Bldg. 11, Rm. 217

 ANT 3311

Indians of the Southeast: An Anthropological Perspective (syllabus)

T Th 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Bldg. 11, Rm. 217

      ANT 4180L/          ANG 6183L

Laboratory Methods in Archaeology (syllabus) / Advanced LMA (syllabus)

T Th 1:00 - 4:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 302

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Upcoming Classes

Spring 2015

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 3101

Principles of Anthropology

T Th 9:30 - 10:45 AM
location tba

 ANT 4172

Historical Archaeology

T Th 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
location tba

 ANG 5173

Historical Research Methods in Archaeology

W 9:00 - 12:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

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Previous Classes

Summer 2014

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 4824

Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 7:30 AM-3:30 PM
May 19-July 25

 ANG 6824

Advanced Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 6:30 AM-5:00 PM
May 19-July 25

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Spring 2014

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 2000

Introduction to Anthropology

T Th 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Bldg. 36, Rm. 108

 ANT 4115

Method & Theory in Archaeology

T Th 9:30 - 10:45 AM
Bldg. 36, Rm. 108

 ANG 5172

Historical Archaeology Seminar

M 9:00 - 12:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

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Fall 2013

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 3158

Florida Archaeology

M W 1:00 - 2:15 PM
Bldg. 11, Rm. 121

 ANT 4172

Historical Archaeology

T Th 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Bldg. 11, Rm. 217

 ANG 5173

Historical Research Methods in Archaeology

W 9:00 - 12:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

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Spring 2013

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 3311

Indians of the Southeast: An Anthropological Perspective

T Th 9:30 - 10:45 AM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 230

 ANT 4115

Method and Theory in Archaeology

T Th 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Bldg. 11, Rm. 122

 ANG 5154

Spanish Florida in Anthropological Perspective

M 9:00 - 12:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

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Fall 2012

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

ANT 4180L

Laboratory Methods in Archaeology

T Th 1:00 - 4:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 307

 ANG 5172

Historical Archaeology Seminar

W  9:00 - 12:00 AM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

 ANT 6110

Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology

M 9:00 - 12:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

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Summer 2012

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 4824

Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 7:30 AM-3:30 PM
May 21-July 27

 ANG 6824

Advanced Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 6:30 AM-5:00 PM
May 21-July 27

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Spring 2012

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 2000

Introduction to Anthropology

T Th 10:00 - 11:15 AM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 230

 ANT 4172

Historical Archaeology

T Th 8:30 - 9:45 AM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 230

 ANG 5173

Historical Research Methods in Archaeology

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

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Fall 2011

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 3158

Florida Archaeology

T Th 10:00 - 11:15 AM
Bldg. 10, Rm. 103

 ANG 6002

Proseminar in Anthropology: Anthropological Perspectives on Colonialism

M  9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

 ANT 6110

Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology

W 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

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Summer 2011

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 4824

Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 7:30 AM-3:30 PM
May 16-July 22

 ANG 6824

Advanced Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 6:30 AM-5:00 PM
May 16-July 22

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Spring 2011

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 3311

Indians of the Southeast: An Anthropological Perspective

T Th 10:00-11:15 AM
Bldg. 10, Rm.
104A

 ANG 4172

Historical Archaeology

T Th 8:30-9:45 AM
Bldg. 10, Rm.
102

 ANG 5172

Historical Archaeology Seminar

M  9:00 - 12:00 AM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104A

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Fall 2010

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

ANT 4180L

Laboratory Methods in Archaeology

T Th 1:00 - 4:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 302

 ANG 5173

Historical Research Methods in Archaeology

W  9:00 - 12:00 AM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104

 ANT 6110

Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology

M  9:00 - 12:00 AM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104

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Summer 2010

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 4824

Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 7:30 AM-3:30 PM
May 17-July 23

 ANT 4821

Combined Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 7:30 AM-3:30 PM
May 17-July 23

 ANG 6824

Advanced Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 6:30 AM-5:00 PM
May 17-July 23

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Spring 2010

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 2000

Introduction to Anthropology

 T Th  8:30-9:45 AM
Bldg. 10, Rm. 102

 ANT 3311

Indians of the Southeast: An Anthropological Perspective

 T Th  10:00-11:15 AM
Bldg. 10, Rm. 104

 ANG 5172

Historical Archaeology Seminar

 W  9:00 - 12:00 AM
Bldg. 89, Rm. 105

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Fall 2009

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 4115

Method and Theory in Archaeology

T Th 8:30-9:45 AM
Bldg. 10, Rm. 102

 ANG 4172

Historical Archaeology

T Th 10:00-11:15 AM
Bldg. 10, Rm. 104

ANT 4180L

Laboratory Methods in Archaeology

T Th 1:00 - 4:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 104

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Summer 2009

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 4824

Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 7:00 AM-4:00 PM
June 1 - August 7

 ANG 6824

Advanced Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

M-F 7:00 AM-4:00 PM
June 1 - August 7

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Spring 2009

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 3101

Principles of Archaeology

 T Th  11:30 AM-12:45 PM
Bldg. 11, Rm. 122

 ANG 5172

Seminar in Historical Archaeology

 Th  8:30 - 11:00 AM
Bldg. 89, Rm. 105

 ANG 5173

Historical Research Methods in Archaeology

W  9:00 - 11:30 AM
Bldg. 89, Rm. 105

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Fall 2008

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 3153

North American Archaeology

M W 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Bldg. 32, Rm. 504

 ANT 3317 (now 3311)

Indians of the Southeast: An Anthropological Perspective

M W 9:30-10:45 AM
Bldg. 32, Rm. 504

 ANG 5990 (now 5154)

Spanish Florida in Anthropological Perspective

Th 9:00 AM-12:00 PM
Bldg. 13, Rm. 114

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Spring 2008

 Course Number  Course Title  Schedule

 ANT 4115

Method and Theory in Archaeology

T Th 2:30-3:45 PM
Bldg. 11, Rm. 223

 ANT 4172

Historical Archaeology

M W 11:00-12:15 PM
Bldg. 41, Rm. 136

 ANG 6931

Proseminar in Anthropology: The Colonial World

Th 9:00-12:00 PM
Bldg. 86, Rm. 137

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Fall 2007

 Course Number  Course Title and Description  Schedule

 ANT 2000

Introduction to Anthropology

 M W F  11:00-11:50 AM
Bldg. 11, Rm. 121

 ANG 5172

Seminar in Historical Archaeology

 W  1:00-4:00 PM
Bldg. 32, Rm. 519

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Course Descriptions
Below are descriptions of the courses I teach, in most cases including Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) which provide students with a more detailed picture of what the course content and expectations are.
Undergraduate Classes  Graduate Classes

 ANT 2000: Introduction to Anthropology

 ANG 5154: Spanish Florida in Anthropological Perspective

 ANT 3101: Principles of Archaeology

 ANG 5172: Historical Archaeology Seminar

 ANT 3153: North American Archaeology

 ANG 5173: Historical Research Methods in Archaeology

 ANT 3158: Florida Archaeology

 ANG 6002: Proseminar in Anthropology: Anth. Persp. on Colonialism

 ANT 3311: Indians of the Southeast: An Anthropological Perspective

 ANG 6110: Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology

 ANT 4115: Method and Theory in Archaeology

 ANG 6183L: Advanced Laboratory Methods in Archaeology

 ANT 4172: Historical Archaeology

 ANG 6824: Advanced Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods

 ANT 4180L: Laboratory Methods in Archaeology

 ANG 6905: Directed Study

 ANG 4824: Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods 

 ANG 6971: Anthropology Thesis

 ANT 4905: Directed Study

 

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Undergraduate Classes

 Course Number and Title  Course Description and Semesters Taught

 ANT 2000: Introduction to Anthropology

Introduction to subdivision of anthropology and anthropological thought, basic treatment of human evolution, origins of civilization, world archaeology and modern work cultures, stressing the continuities of human nature.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Define and explain anthropology as a discipline which seeks to explain similarities and differences among humans in time and space using holistic and comparative analysis.
  2. Identify and describe the four subfields of Americanist anthropology, including cultural anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistics.
  3. Define and explain the attributes and importance of human culture.
  4. Describe the biological basis of evolutionary theory as it relates to human variation and adaptation.
  5. Identify the relationship between humans and other primates, and describe the evidence for the evolutionary sequence leading to modern humans.
  6. Describe and explain the importance of major steps in the cultural evolution of humans, including the emergence of food production and political complexity.
  7. Describe and explain the anthropological perspective on human language and communication, ethnicity and race, subsistence and trade, political systems, gender, social organization, religion, and art.
  8. Identify and describe the historical relationship between colonialism and globalization, and the continuing impact of these issues on the modern world.

 ANT 3101: Principles of Archaeology

Detailed explanation of the principles and methodology of current archaeology in U.S.; includes a brief history and theoretical orientation development of American archaeology.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify and describe archaeology as a subfield of anthropology, its relationship to other related disciplines.
  2. Describe the origins and history of Americanist archaeology, as well as the major theoretical paradigms that have influenced it.
  3. Identify and describe the methods and techniques archaeologists employ to locate archaeological sites through survey, remote sensing, and testing.
  4. Identify and describe the methods and techniques archaeologists use to conduct excavations and recover archaeological specimens and samples using appropriate record-keeping.
  5. Describe and explain the principles of archaeological stratigraphy, and how they relate to site formation processes.
  6. Identify and describe the methods and techniques archaeologists use to date finds and develop chronologies, including both relative and absolute dating.
  7. Describe and explain the relationship between the dimensions of time, space, and form, and how they relate to archaeological classification and typology.
  8. Describe and explain the importance of taphonomy, experimental archaeology, and ethnoarchaeology in relating the modern archaeological record to past human behavior.
  9. Identify and describe the methods and techniques employed by zooarchaeologists, archaeobotanists, and bioarchaeologists to study animal, plant, and human remains from archaeological sites.
  10. Describe and explain how archaeology contributes to the understanding of different dimensions of past human cultures during both the prehistoric and historic eras, including technology, social and political systems, and belief systems.
  11. Identify and describe other important roles for archaeology as applied in the modern world, including cultural resource management, repatriation, forensics, and heritage education.

 ANT 3153: North American Archaeology

Overview of archaeology of North America. Emphasis on patterns of development of regional cultures based on the archaeological record. Open to students in all majors.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify and describe historical attempts to explain the origins of North America’s indigenous peoples, culminating in modern archaeological science.
  2. Describe and evaluate differing theories regarding the nature and timing of humankind’s arrival in North America.
  3. Describe the cultural characteristics of the first North American Indians, and explain how regional cultures emerged over the course of time.
  4. Identify and describe the major cultural and geographical regions of prehistoric North America, and delineate the cultural chronology of each region, comparing and contrasting them with one another.
  5. Identify the major episodes and trajectory early European contact, colonization, and territorial expansion across North America, and describe the cultural transformations that have affected both indigenous and immigrant groups since first contact.
  6. Identify and describe major archaeological sites and discoveries that have contributed to scholarship for different regions, periods, and cultures in North America.

 ANT 3158: Florida Archaeology

Archaeology of Florida with emphasis on general patterns of development of Florida Indians. Field trips to area archaeological sites.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify and describe the major geographical and chronological parameters used by archaeologists to study Florida’s prehistoric and historic past.
  2. Describe the origins of the Florida Indians during the Ice Age, and trace the archaeological evidence of their cultural evolution through the European colonial era, including material culture, subsistence, settlement patterns, social organization, and belief systems.
  3. Identify the major episodes of early European contact, colonization, and missionization in Florida, and describe the range and extent of their impact on Florida’s indigenous populations based on archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence.
  4. Identify and describe the contribution of archaeology toward understanding the post-colonial era in Florida.
  5. Identify and evaluate current issues surrounding the preservation and interpretation of the archaeological record in the modern era.
 ANT 3311: Indians of the Southeast: An Anthropological Perspective A survey course of the Native American groups in the Southeastern U.S. and their culture. It begins with an overview of prehistory and continues into the early 19th century. Examines such key areas as socio-cultural archaeology, archaeology, biological anthropology and history.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe and explain the prehistoric origins of the Southeastern Indians, and identify the major culture periods defined by archaeologists for this region.
  2. Identify the major episodes of early European contact and colonization in the Southeast, and describe the range and extent of their impact on the Southeastern Indians.
  3. Explain and evaluate the origins of the well-known historic Southeastern Indian tribes during the historic period, and compare and contrast their histories and cultures.
  4. Identify and describe cultural characteristics common to most Southeastern Indian groups, including social organization, subsistence, belief systems, ceremony, art, music, recreation, and language.
  5. Describe and explain the cultural transformations and accommodations experienced by the Southeastern Indians during the later historic period, including Removal.
  6. Identify the major surviving Southeastern Indian groups in the present day, and describe current affairs and concerns pertinent to their future.
 ANT 4115: Method and Theory in Archaeology History and evolution of archaeological methods and theory in the United States. Major schools of thought and currently developing ideas are compared and contrasted.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Explain the importance of method and theory in archaeological inquiry, defining and distinguishing the difference between data, techniques, methods, and theory.
  2. Describe the differences between low-, middle-, and high-level theory.
  3. Identify and evaluate the relationships between past human culture, past human behavior, and resultant archaeological deposits both in the past and the present.
  4. Trace the origins and history of the development of archaeological method and theory from antiquity to the present day, describing the historical relationships between major schools of thought, particularly as related to the development of broader anthropological theory.
  5. Identify, describe, compare, and contrast the major theoretical approaches used by archaeologists in the twentieth century and today, citing notable practicioners and published work.
  6. Describe and evaluate the present state of theoretical development in archaeology, focusing on the contrast between processual and postprocessual approaches.
 ANT 4172: Historical Archaeology Principles and methodology of historical archaeology; includes history of this specialty and theoretical development. Course is detailed and is required for Historical Archaeology graduate students prior to taking ANG 5172.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify and describe historical archaeology as a specialty within the archaeological subfield of anthropology, and its relationship to other specialties, subfields, and disciplines.
  2. Trace the origins and history of historical archaeology as it is practiced in North America and elsewhere in the world.
  3. Identify and describe the types of sites investigated by historical archaeologists, comparing and contrasting the data and methods associated with each.
  4. Describe and explain how artifacts are studied and utilized by historical archaeologists, and how they situate their data in time and space, distinguishing those methods and techniques that are unique to historical as opposed to prehistoric archaeology.
  5. Identify and describe the methods and techniques that historical archaeologists use to find and document sites prior to excavation, including documentary research, oral interviews, survey, and architectural fieldwork.
  6. Identify and describe the methods and techniques that historical archaeologists use to conduct field excavation and followup labwork.
  7. Describe and explain the major theoretical approaches used by historical archaeologists to interpret the historical past, including the identification and analysis of groups distinguished by social class, gender, ethnicity, and race.
  8. Describe and explain the role of historical archaeology in cultural resource management, and the range of other career options available to historical archaeologists.
  9. Identify and evaluate ethical and political issues commonly confronted by historical archaeologists, particularly as relates to relationships with living descendant groups.
 ANT 4180L: Laboratory Methods in Archaeology A practical introduction to laboratory methods in archaeology, including review of material culture identification and laboratory procedures.  Students are required to complete laboratory analysis on actual materials recovered in the field as a class project..
 ANG 4824: Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods  On site training in terrestrial field methods includes use of hand tools, surveying equipment, and some power equipment. Emphasized in the field are excavation techniques in a variety of situations, field scale drawings, and documentation. Field lab methods are often included. Permission is required. Material and Supply Fee will be assessed..

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe and explain the purpose of archaeological fieldwork, and the relationship of data gathered in the field to the anthropological research goals of an archaeological project.
  2. Demonstrate the proper use of survey instruments such as a total station or transit in archaeological fieldwork, including topographic mapping, horizontal and vertical grid layout, laying in excavation units, and elevation control during excavation.
  3. Demonstrate the proper use of a range of hand tools in archaeological excavation, including unit and level excavation, feature excavation, and plan and profile cleaning.
  4. Demonstrate proper archaeological record-keeping practices through field notes, forms, bag labeling, photographs, and scale drawings.
  5. Demonstrate the proper care of archaeological field equipment, including inventory, cleaning, maintenance, and repair.
 ANT 4905: Directed Study Content adapted to individual student needs.

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Graduate Classes

 Course Number and Title  Course Description

 ANG 5154: Spanish Florida in Anthropological Perspective

A comprehensive anthropological exploration of the origins and evolution of Spanish Florida as a colonial society between 1513 and 1763.  Draws upon the results of historical, ethnohistorical, archaeological (terrestrial and maritime), bioanthropological, and other research disciplines to present the Florida colony as a geographically-extensive multi-ethnic society within the context of the global Spanish empire.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe and explain the chronological and geographical dimensions of Spanish Florida during the First Spanish Period (1513-1763), relating local settings and specific events to broader patterns and processes with multi-regional and even global implications.
  2. Identify and describe the diverse ethnic groups which comprised greater Spanish Florida, including indigenous Native Americans and settler populations from Spain, Africa, and elsewhere.
  3. Describe and evaluate the systemic relationships betweeen constituent populations and groups within and beyond greater Spanish Florida, including political, economic, and social relationships at many different scales of analysis.
  4. Identify short- and long-term changes and variations in the colonial system of Spanish Florida, relating them to historical, systemic, and evolutionary processes affecting Florida from within and without.
  5. Compare and contrast the colonial system of Spanish Florida with those of surrounding European colonial powers, exploring the implications and effects of these differences on constituent and neighboring populations.
  6. Identify and describe the diverse evidentiary basis for understanding Spanish Florida as a distinctive human society, and the many academic disciplines and subdisciplines that employ this data in different and complementary ways.

 ANG 5172: Historical Archaeology Seminar

Emphasizes the goals, methods and theoretical base of historical archaeology. Particular emphasis is placed on theoretical development, acculturation, ethnicity, archaeological methods and documentary research. The class is an organized seminar with readings and discussions of specific topics.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe and evaluate the theoretical basis for the historical archaeology as a discipline, including its relationship to general anthropology, prehistoric archaeology, and history.
  2. Identify and describe the distinctive methodology of historical archaeology, particularly in comparison and contrast to that employed by prehistoric archaeologists.
  3. Compare and contrast archaeological (material) and documentary (textual) sources of evidence regarding the human past, and how each relates to the practice of historical archaeology.
  4. Compare and contrast the techniques, methods, and theoretical emphases of terrestrial and maritime historical archaeology, and explain how each subdiscipline complements the other.
  5. Identify and describe how historical archaeology has contributed to our understanding of the emergence of the modern world, focusing on the colonial expansion of Europe since 1492 and the increasing degree of systemic interconnectivity across the globe.
  6. Describe and evaluate the extent to which archaeological evidence for material culture contributes to our understanding of human variation in areas such as ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status.

 ANG 5173: Historical Research Methods in Archaeology

A practical introduction to the use of historical documents in archeological research, both as primary sources of data for understanding the past, and as a complement to archaeological and other types of data. Examples and case-studies will center on the history of Florida during Spanish, British, and early American periods.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify and describe disciplinary relationships between anthropology and history, and the theoretical and methodological context of historical archaeology.
  2. Describe the many sources of evidence that are employed in historical archaeology, identifying the distinguishing features of historical documents as one source of evidence.
  3. Identify and classify the various types of primary historical documents, how and why they were generated, and how originals and/or copies were distributed and archived.
  4. Evaluate the extent to which we gain access to primary documentary texts considering issues of paleography, transcription, translation, and paraphrasing.
  5. Explain various methods for evaluating the credibility or reliability of documentary texts, distinguishing primary and secondary sources of evidence.
  6. Describe methods for employing historical documents as data for archaeological research in a rigorous scientific manner.
  7. Appraise the extent to which the documentary and archaeological record complement one another, and how apparent differences can be reconciled.
 ANG 6002: Proseminar in Anthropology: Anthropological Perspectives on Colonialism An exploration of colonialism and colonial systems throughout history, using the perspectives of cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and archaeology. The seminar's goals are to introduce students to the subject, provide in-depth understanding of current issues, and examine the variety of theoretical and methodological approaches used by anthropologists.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify and describe the broad range of circumstances, contexts, and cultural systems to which the terms colony, colonization, and colonialism might be applied throughout human history and across the globe.
  2. Identify and explore the diverse motivations and reasons for colonialism in different times and places.
  3. Identify and describe the range of strategies that were employed for colonial expansion.
  4. Describe the relationship between colonial settlers and nearby indigenous groups in a diversity of circumstances.
  5. Describe and explain the range of mechanisms by which constituent groups were assimilated and  integrated into new colonial societies.
  6. Identify and evaluate the consequences of colonialism from a cultural and biological standpoint.
  7. Describe and explain how colonial systems come to an end in different times and places.
  8. Describe and evaluate the legacy of colonialism in the modern world.
 ANG 6110: Advanced Method and Theory in Archaeology Includes an overview of the history and development of American archeology with an emphasis on methodological and theoretical topics. Class is an organized seminar with readings and discussions of specific topics.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Explain the importance of method and theory to the practice of archaeological inquiry.
  2. Define and distinguish the difference between data, techniques, methods, and theory.
  3. Evaluate the methodological and theoretical implications of how archaeologists construct interpretations from the material record of the past, how that material record relates to the living cultures that produced it, and how those cultures can be understood in an anthropological perspective.
  4. Identify and describe the major theoretical approaches used by archaeologists during the twentieth century up to the present day, citing notable practicioners and published work.
  5. Describe how these modern theoretical approaches relate to earlier schools of thought from the 19th century and earlier.
  6. Evaluate and organize these theoretical approaches as to their relationship both to one another, and to broader theoretical paradigms in anthropology and other scholarly disciplines.
 ANG 6183L: Advanced Laboratory Methods in Archaeology Advanced training in the operation of an archaeological laboratory. Activities include laboratory organization and management as well as planning laboratory activities to meet deadlines, assignment of tasks, training, and supervising beginning students. Graduate students will instruct undergraduate students in artifact indentification and documentation.
 ANG 6824: Advanced Terrestrial Archaeological Field Methods  Advanced training in field methods including survey, testing, and site excavation. Also includes training in project planning, budgeting, supervision, and integration of information recovered from the field. Material and Supply Fee will be assessed.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe and explain the purpose of archaeological fieldwork, and the relationship of data gathered in the field to the anthropological research goals of an archaeological project.
  2. Demonstrate the proper use of survey instruments such as a total station or transit in archaeological fieldwork, including topographic mapping, horizontal and vertical grid layout, laying in excavation units, and elevation control during excavation.
  3. Demonstrate the proper use of a range of hand tools in archaeological excavation, including unit and level excavation, feature excavation, and plan and profile cleaning.
  4. Demonstrate proper archaeological record-keeping practices through field notes, forms, bag labeling, photographs, and scale drawings.
  5. Demonstrate the proper care of archaeological field equipment, including inventory, cleaning, maintenance, and repair.
  6. Demonstrate proper preparatory and followup procedures before and after fieldwork, including assigning provenience numbers to artifact bags, naming and archiving digital photographs, and checking field records on a daily and weekly basis.
  7. Demonstrate organizational and leadership skills in supervising small groups of undergraduate students in archaeological fieldwork under a variety of circumstances.
  8. Demonstrate instructional and mentoring skills in providing hands-on training to undergraduate students in a range of archaeological fieldwork techniques.
 ANG 6905: Directed Study Content adapted to individual student needs.
 ANG 6971: Anthropology Thesis Preparation of masters thesis which includes problem identification, review of literature, design, data collection, analysis, and results. Permission of Thesis Committee required. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis only.

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