Maps of Spanish Florida

The maps below are intended to provide a basic overview of the spatial extent of Spanish Florida as measured through the locations of its earliest explorations and settlements, its mission provinces and later garrisons, as well as its final configuration after the collapse of the mission system in the context of English and French borderlands struggles.  For the sake of simplicity, many details are of course left off these maps.  Click on each map to see a larger version.

Spanish Florida 1513-1570 / Spanish Florida 1587-1706 / Spanish Florida 1706-1763Spanish Florida Borderlands, 1670-1763


Spanish Florida, 1513-1570

The map below shows major Spanish expeditions and settlements both for the period prior to the 1565 establishment of St. Augustine, and for the first five years of military fortification under Pedro Menéndez de Avilés.

Spanish Florida, 1513-1570

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Spanish Florida, 1587-1706

The map below shows the maximum extent of Spanish Florida during the primary Franciscan mission period between 1587 and 1706, including the first of three presidios established in succession in Pensacola starting in 1698, and the short-lived Apalachicola fort.

Spanish Florida, 1587-1706

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Spanish Florida, 1706-1763

The map below shows the locations of the surviving Spanish settlements after the collapse of the Franciscan mission system by 1706. In addition to the locations of presidios at St. Augustine and Pensacola (which included Presidio Santa Maria de Galve from 1698-1719, the brief relocation of this presidio eastward to St. Josephs Bay from 1719 to 1722, Presidio Isla de Santa Rosa from 1722 to 1756, and Presidio San Miguel de Panzacola from 1756 to 1763), the post-1718 Spanish fort at San Marcos de Apalache is also shown.

Spanish Florida, 1706-1763

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Spanish Florida Borderlands, 1670-1763

This map shows the locations of Spanish Florida's primary 18th-century presidios as well as neighboring settlements and fortifications by the English (in blue) and French (in green).

Spanish Florida Borderlands, 1670-1763

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