Instructors

Meet the Instructors


Dr. Amy Mitchell-Cook

Is an associate professor and chair of the Department of History at the University of West Florida. Her specialization in maritime history—with an emphasis on shipwreck narratives—stems from her many years of experience working on shipwreck projects around the world, from the US to Bermuda to West Africa.

Dr. Cook has published several articles on maritime history and in 2013 the University of South Carolina Press published her manuscript, A Sea of Misadventures: Shipwreck and Survival in Early America, which examines shipwreck narratives from the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.

She has a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Florida, an M.A. in Maritime Studies from East Carolina University, and a Ph.D. in History from Penn State University.

Dr. Amy Mitchell-Cook

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Dr. Scott Keller

Is a professor of supply chain logistics management and marketing at the University of West Florida, where he was instrumental in developing and launching UWF’s standalone BSBA Supply Chain Logistics Management degree.

Dr. Keller received his Ph.D. from the University of Arkansas and has been on faculty at Penn State and Michigan State. He is the co-author of the book "The Definitive Guide to Warehousing," is an associate editor for the Journal of Business Logistics and is a member of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals. He also conducts research for numerous corporations—and his research is published in leading logistics journals.

Dr. Keller spends much of his time taking students into the field to experience logistics first-hand. Being a port town, Pensacola is the perfect place to study and engage in logistics and supply chain management.

Dr. Scott Keller

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Dr. Klaus Meyer-Arendt

Is professor emeritus in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of West Florida, where he taught courses in coastal geomorphology and cartography. Besides the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, his research interests include coastal tourism, human-environment relations, hurricane impacts, and coastal dynamics.

Dr. Meyer-Arendt has published many dozens of articles in the realm of coastal studies and coastal tourism impacts, mostly around the Gulf of Mexico. He has co-edited two books, including Understanding Tropical Coastal and Island Tourism Development, and is a former Fulbright scholar to Yucatán (Mexico), where he continues to conduct research.

Dr. Meyer-Arendt received a B.A. in Geography—and a Certificate in Latin American Studies—from Portland State University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Geography from Louisiana State University.

Dr. Klaus Meyer-Arendt

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Dr. John R. Bratten

Is an associate professor and chair of UWF’s Anthropology department. A graduate of the Nautical Archaeology Program at Texas A&M, he has extensive experience in the analysis and conservation of artifacts from diverse sources, from the sunken 17th-century town of Port Royal, Jamaica, to Revolutionary War munitions recovered from Lake Champlain.

Prior to earning his Ph.D. at Texas A&M, Dr. Bratten studied at Missouri State University where he earned a B.S. and an M.S. At the University of West Florida, he has served as principal investigator for numerous underwater archaeology projects, including the 2006 discovery of a second shipwreck from the 1559 Spanish colonization fleet of Don Tristán de Luna y Arellano.

Dr. Bratten teaches courses in Artifact Conservation in Archaeology, Nautical Archaeology, Shipwreck Archaeology, Maritime Archaeological Field Methods, Introduction to Maritime Studies, and Exploring World Archaeology.

Dr. John Bratten

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Dr. Bill Huth

Is a Distinguished University Professor at the University of West Florida and actively engaged in marine-related economic research, including the continued development of artificial reefs and their place in fishery management.

Dr. Huth has been a UWF Scientific Diver, is a member of the AAUS, is an artificial reef research specialist, and is the author of professional publications on diving and marine resource valuation in Marine Resource Economics, Resource and Energy Economics, and the Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics.

His current work examines the lionfish invasion problem and he developed the first measures of consumer willingness to pay for lionfish control through the creation of a fishery. That work is currently under review for publication and was presented at the 2016 European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists Conference in Zurich, Switzerland.

Dr. Bill Huth talks to Christian Garman about the lionfish invasion