Uvah,Josaphat_211

Dr. Josaphat Uvah

  • Position:  Professor
  • Department:  Mathematics and Statistics
  • Office Location:  Building 4, Room 346
  • juvah@uwf.edu
  • Campus: 8504742857

Biography:

Dr. Josaphat “Jossy” Uvah is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, where he has taught graduate and undergraduate courses since 1990. His research explores differential and integral equations, nonlinear dynamical systems, mathematical modeling of real-life situations such as true altitude, and impulsive hereditary phenomena to include automatic landing gear for airplanes and supersonic gas flow. Uvah’s studies have also examined the design, implementation and assessment of synchronous distance M.S. Mathematics programs, and students’ readiness for, and performance in, general education mathematics and statistics courses.

His refereed publications appear in reputable outlets including Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications, Journal of Nonlinear Analysis: Hybrid Systems, Applicable Analysis, Journal of Computers and Mathematics with Applications, US-China Education Review, and Journal of Mathematical Sciences and Mathematics Education. Aside from addressing many academic conferences on various topical issues, Uvah reviews manuscripts for publication in Journal of Differential Equations, Journal of Mathematical Modeling and Applied Mathematics letters. He holds a Ph.D. in Applicable Mathematics from the University of Louisiana-Lafayette. He earned an M.S. in Mathematics from the University of Illinois, an M.Sc. in Applied Mathematics from the University of Jos in Nigeria and a B.Sc. in Mathematics and Statistics from the University of Nigeria.

Degrees & Institutions:

Ph.D. Applicable Mathematics, University of Louisiana-Lafayette
M.S. Mathematics, University of Illinois
M.Sc. Applied Mathematics, University of Jos in Nigeria
B.Sc. Mathematics and Statistics, University of Nigeria.

Research:

His research explores differential and integral equations, nonlinear dynamical systems, mathematical modeling of real-life situations such as true altitude, and impulsive hereditary phenomena to include automatic landing gear for airplanes and supersonic gas flow.


Keywords: differential and integral equations, nonlinear dynamical systems, mathematical modeling, true altitude modeling and automatic landing gear for airplanes, supersonic gas flow, impulsive hereditary phenomena, phosphorous diagenesis, predicting performance in statistics courses, synchronous distance teaching for Mathematics graduate students, and students’ readiness for College Algebra