Kwame Owusu Daaku

Dr. Kwame Owusu-Daaku

  • Position:  Assistant Professor
  • Department:  Earth and Environmental Sciences
  • Office Location:  Building 13, Room 317
  • kowusudaaku@uwf.edu
  • Campus: 8504743314

Biography:

Dr. Kwame N. Owusu-Daaku, an Assistant Professor, is a qualitative researcher with interests in human geography, urban planning, and international development. His current research interests include the ways in which climate change adaptation has influenced the practice of international development; particularly how this influence impacts rural and urban poor livelihoods – two areas of interest he simultaneously studies through a focus on peri-urban areas. His dissertation research examined sea defense systems as an adaptation to climate change in the Volta River Delta of Ghana from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders. 

A co-authored paper stemming from his dissertation research placed as a finalist (2nd place) in the 2016 Annual Reducing Urban Poverty Graduate Paper Competition sponsored by the Wilson Center, Cities Alliance, IHC Global, USAID, and the World Bank. He has also worked on climate change adaptation projects in Ghana, Mali and Malawi as a member of the Humanitarian Response and Development Lab (HURDL) at Clark University. Kwame earned his Ph.D.  in Geography from the University of South Carolina, where he was a Presidential Fellow and helped found the Graduate Civic Scholars Program. During his Ph.D., he was also awarded a Norman E. Borlaug Leadership Enhancement in Agriculture (Borlaug LEAP) fellowship.

He teaches courses related to human geography and environmental management and planning and is also interested in community engagement and civic scholarship. 

Degrees & Institutions:

Ph.D. Geography, University of South Carolina, 2017
MS Urban and Regional Planning, University of Iowa, 2013
BSc Development Planning, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, 2009

Research:

Research interests include the ways in which climate change adaptation has influenced the practice of international development; particularly how this influence impacts rural and urban poor livelihoods-two areas of interests he simultaneously studies through a focus on peri-urban areas. Dissertation research examined sea defense systems as an adaptation to climate change in the Volta River Delta of Ghana from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders. Key research words: 

Current Courses:

  • Urban Planning
  • Graduate Seminar in Climate Change Adaptation

Special Interests:

I am a researcher on the DECCMA (Deltas, Vulnerability, and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation) consortium. DECCMA, a five year multi-country interdisciplinary and collaborative research project, examines the role of migration, among other adaptations, to climate change impacts such as sea-level rise, erosion, and flooding in river deltas in Bangladesh, Ghana, and India.

Publications:

    Peer-reviewed journal articles
    Carr E.R. and Owusu-Daaku K.N. (2016) The shifting epistemologies of vulnerability in climate services for development:
    the case of Mali’s agrometeorological advisory programme. Area 48 (1): 7-17

    Chapter in edited volume
    Owusu-Daaku K.N. and Diko S.K. (2017) The Sea Defense Project in the Ada East District and its Implications for Climate
    Change Policy Implementation in Ghana’s Peri-Urban Areas in Urban Perspectives: Climate Change, Migration, Planning
    and Financing. Wilson Center Urban Sustainability Laboratory. Washington, DC


Keywords: climate change adaptation, political ecology, coastal protection infrastructure, international development, deltaic environments, qualitative research