CAP Research

The Center for Applied Psychology conducts interdisciplinary theory-based and problem-based research aimed at improving human performance and the quality of life.


The Center for Applied Psychology conducts interdisciplinary theory-based and problem-based research aimed at improving human performance and the quality of life. CAP's faculty continues their extensive involvement in broadening the psychological knowledgebase of the community. By achieving a better understanding our world and the individuals who inhabit it, CAP strives to enhance the human experience on a holistic level through applied scientific research across the spectrum of psychology-related subfields.

CAP researchers partnered with both the Veteran’s Resource Center and the Educational Research Center for Child Development for this study which examined the effects of student’s various roles, work/military, school, and family.

CAP researchers have partnered with both the Veteran’s Resource Center and the Educational Research Center for Child Development to conduct a study examining how student’s various roles (work/military, school, and family) can conflict and enrich one another and how this, in turn, can be transmitted between family members. The researchers are particularly interested in how role conflict in parents might impact behavior and development of daycare-aged children.



CAP worked with the US Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory to help identify military occupational specialties that were disproportionately affected by injuries associated with mild traumatic brain injury.

CAP worked with the US Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory to help identify military occupational specialties that were disproportionately affected by injuries associated with mild traumatic brain injury.  Researchers then identified the KSAs that were most impacted by these injuries.  (below is the abstract from the article in Military Medicine (Lawson, Kass, Dhillon, Milam, Cho, & Rupert, 2016) which describes the results.

    • Objective: Identifying Department of Defense (DoD) occupations affected by injuries to the head and sensory systems. Methods: We explored the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database to identify occupations with the highest incidence of injured personnel, then ranked how frequently they occurred in a top 10 list for each of four injury categories (head/brain, visual, auditory, vestibular) encompassing 25 injury codes. Across all four categories, the most affected occupations were identified, among which we chose three Army combat-related military occupational specialties (MOSs) for detailed study.

      • We identified skills needed to perform these MOSs and explored whether MOScritical deficits could be expected following the injuries. Results: Some DoD occupations are more likely to suffer from these injuries, including Infantry, Combat Operations Control, Artillery/Gunnery, Motor Vehicle Operator, Combat Engineering, and Armor/Amphibious. Within these DoD occupations, we explored three Army combatant MOSs:
        • Infantry (11B), Cavalry Scout (19D), and Artillery (13B), confirming that these jobs are likely to be disrupted by injuries within the four categories. Conclusions: Head and sensory injuries disproportionately affect certain military occupations. Relatively few injuries disrupt combat-related abilities that are job critical (e.g., firearms operation) and job specific (e.g., Artillery gunnery problems); these should be the focus of efforts to improve rehabilitation and RTD outcomes.


CAP partnered with the Florida Department of Education on two large-scale projects. concerning best practices for assessing student performance in the hard-to-measure courses of music, visual arts, and physical education in kindergarten through twelfth-grade (K-12).

CAP partnered with the Florida Department of Education on two large-scale projects. concerning best practices for assessing student performance in the hard-to-measure courses of music, visual arts, and physical education in kindergarten through twelfth-grade (K-12).  

    • Project 1: This project consisted of three major parts:

1. Review the literature on assessment and its role in the US education system, value-added models and performance evaluation, and the state of hard-to-measure content areas.
2. Conduct a survey of each state’s assessment practices in hard-to-measure content areas.
3. Provide recommendations based on parts 1 and 2 above.

      • Project 2: This project had four major parts.

1. Identify student learning outcomes and/or appropriate grade level expectations that are based on extant standards.

2. Provide a third-party review of the State’s pilot data (provided to UWF by the FLDOE) of the objective measures of hard-to-measure content areas.

3. Identify and recommend to the FLDOE various performance measures that can be used to assess music, visual arts, and physical education.

4. Provide a recommendation of a comprehensive model of student assessment.  



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