Projects:

Stress, Coping, and Maternal Health in Pensacola, Florida

Meredith Marten and Roz Fisher have been working with students to examine chronic social and environmental stressors that may contribute to disproportionately high rates of poor maternal and infant health outcomes in Escambia county. In Fall 2016, Dr. Marten received a New Faculty Grant from UWF to conduct this mixed-methods exploratory research, using semi-structured interviews, surveys, and indicators of cardiovascular health and emotional distress. Future research will more broadly include interviews with health care workers and community education and support coordinators to better evaluate the multiple scales at which stressors and barriers to care can emerge, as well as to document the numerous ways in which these community health professionals are working to promote good health and enact systemic change. 

 
https://news.uwf.edu/uwf- seeking-mothers-to- participate-in-study-on- maternal-mortality-rate/

https://www.pnj.com/story/ news/2018/03/21/stress- killing-pensacola-moms-and- babies-uwf-wants-find-out/ 438253002/

Recent Publications:

See UWF Institutional Repository

  • 2017  Marten, Meredith G. From Emergency to Sustainability: Shifting Objectives in the US Government’s HIV/AIDS Response in Tanzania. Global Public Health 12 (8): 988-1003.
  • 2017  Young, Alyson G., and Meredith Marten. Identifying and Using Indicators to Assess Program Effectiveness: Food Intake, Biomarkers, and Nutritional Evaluation. In Food Health: Nutrition, Technology, and Public Health, Janet Chrzan and John A. Brett, editors. Berghahn Press, New York.

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    2016 Collings, Peter, Meredith G. Marten, Tristan Pearce and Alyson G. Young. Country Food Sharing Networks, Household Structure, and Implications for Understanding Food Insecurity in Arctic Canada. Ecology of Food and Nutrition 55 (1): 30-49.

  • 2015 Abramowitz, Sharon, Meredith Marten, and Catherine Panter-Brick. Medical Humanitarianism:
    Anthropologists Speak Out on Policy and Practice. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 29 (1): 1-23.