Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series

The Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series fosters dialogue about First Amendment issues and is made possible by a generous gift from the Jane G. and Fred K. Seligman Endowment.


About the Series

Since its inception in 2009, the Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series has fostered dialogue about First Amendment issues by uniting the University and local community in meaningful conversation. We aim not only to promote a robust discussion, but, like the freedoms protected in the United States, we hope this opportunity for free discussion will also promote understanding and friendship among our fellow citizens.

This lecture series is made possible by a generous gift from the Jane G. and Fred K. Seligman Endowment. As a Jewish émigré from Nazi Germany in 1934, Fred Seligman cherished the freedoms protected by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. Having experienced the challenges of a nation at war, Fred Seligman understood the dilemmas that nations like the United States face in protecting these freedoms. While conscious that our liberties are always fragile, Mr. Seligman believed that the continued protection of freedom requires strong institutions of government respected by its citizens. The hope of the Seligman family is that this series will foster a deeper discussion among the community, faculty and students; particularly as the students prepare to lead in a world in which they may have to discern what is right and just. 


 

Senator Bob Graham

January 16, “The Art of Public Dialogue” with Senator Bob Graham

Senator Bob Graham was the Honored Speaker at the Inaugural Event of the Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series

On January 16, 2018, the inaugural Seligman First Amendment Lecture Series presented Senator Bob Graham for an event entitled “The Art of Public Dialogue.”

During “The Art of Public Dialogue,” Drs. Kelly Carr and Jocelyn Evans, along with Graham, examined the role of partisan rancor, social movement, organized protest, civic space, and technology in shaping the character of public discourse over the last several decades. Panelists will discuss the importance of civic engagement, participatory politics, public debate, collective consensus building, space for dissent, and demonstration of mutual respect.