Courses: Developmental Psychology (DEP)

Course: DEP2004 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
Hours: 3.0 Repeatable For Credit: No Maximum Hours Credit: 3.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering: Fall Spring Summer
Course Description:
Survey of major themes and recent findings in the area of human development across the life span. Emphasis will be on the major transitions from fetal development through death in the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains. The impact of ethnic, gender, and cultural factors on development will be examined. (General Studies Course: SS/BEH)

Student Learning Outcomes:

At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to:

1. Differentiate key lifespan concepts and theories within diverse cultures.

2. Demonstrate knowledge of the scientific method, research designs, and typical lifespan studies.

3. Explain the nature x nature interaction, including single and multiple gene effects, range of genotypic and phenotypic interaction, and niche phenotypes.

4. Illustrate differences among physical, psychological, and social frames of development.

5. Identify the primary tools the infant has for exploring the world.

6. Demonstrate knowledge of Piaget’s four periods of cognitive development by providing specific examples in each period.

7. Illustrate the similarities between human and machine information processing hardware and software.

8. Differentiate among primary aspects of socioemotional development: trust/mistrust, emotions, gender roles/identity.

9. Demonstrate the general physical and cognitive development of school-age children, including aptitudes, academic skills, and special children.

10. Demonstrate the general physical and cognitive development of middle childhood, including family relationships, peer relationships, and stereotypes.

11. Illustrate physical, psychological, and social issues related to rites of passage, including pubertal changes, health, cognition, and moral reasoning.

12. Demonstrate socioemotional development issues in adolescence, including identity/self esteem, romantic relationships, work, and dependency of drugs, depression, and delinquency.

13. Explain the major physical, cognitive, and personality development issues of becoming an adult, including transitions to adulthood, lifestyle factors, adult intelligence, and personal control beliefs.

14. Compare relationships in young and middle adulthood, including friendships, love, violence, singlehood, family life cycle, and divorce/remarriage.

15. Give examples of major occupational and lifestyle issues in young and middle adulthood, including occupational selection, discrimination, occupational transitions, work and family, and leisure activities.

16. Differentiate the unique challenges of middle adulthood, including physical changes and health, intelligence, five-factor personality model, and the sandwich generation.

17. Summarize the major issues of later life, including demographics, third/fourth age of life, physical/psychological/social deterioration, and intervention strategies.

18. Summarize the primary theories of aging and compare the major social issues associated with aging.

19. Differentiate among the definitions of death, ethical issues associated with dying and death, grief processes and coping strategies, and bereavement experiences throughout the lifespan.

 
Course: DEP2905 - DIRECTED STUDY
Hours: 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:
 
 
Course: DEP2990 - SPECIAL COURSE
Hours: 0.0 - 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:
 
 
Course: DEP3103 - CHILD DEVELOPMENT
Hours: 3.0 Repeatable For Credit: No Maximum Hours Credit: 3.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering: Fall Spring Summer
Course Description:
Development and behavior of children from infancy to adolescence from two viewpoints: age periods (prenatal, infancy, preschool, school) and areas (physical, intellectual, personality, etc.).

Student Learning Outcomes:

Objectives:

1. Describe and critique key theoretical perspectives on child development
Evaluation: In-class examinations, out of class assignments

2. Describe, compare, and contrast key changes in the physical, cognitive, and socioemotional
characteristics across childhood
Evaluation: In-class examinations, out of class assignments

3. Describe and discuss strengths and weaknesses of research methodologies typically used in the
study of child development
Evaluation: In-class examinations, out of class assignments

4. Relate our discussions of child development to your own experiences
Evaluation: Out of class assignments

 
Course: DEP3905 - DIRECTED STUDY
Hours: 0.0 - 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:
 
 
Course: DEP4305 - PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE
Hours: 3.0 Repeatable For Credit: No Maximum Hours Credit: 3.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering: Fall
Course Description:
Social, emotional, biological, and intellectual elements of adolescence. Addresses the transitions from childhood to adolescence and from adolescence to adulthood. Application of theories is stressed. Option for partial credit via field experiences. Credit cannot be receive in both DEP 4305 and DEP 4304.

Student Learning Outcomes:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of content related to intellectual, emotional, social, and biological changes across adolescence.

2. Demonstrate understandings of changing roles of adolescents within the family, peer group, school, and a broad range of cultures.

3. Demonstrate understandings of the relationships among race, gender, sexual orientation, and social status and the adolescent’s wellbeing across the adolescent years.

4. Apply understandings developed across the course (see above outcomes) to contemporary issues or problems that impact the transition through adolescence within the intellectual, emotional, social/cultural, and/or biological domains.

5. Demonstrate critical reading and thinking skills.

 
Course: DEP4402 - ADULTHOOD AND AGING
Hours: 3.0 Repeatable For Credit: No Maximum Hours Credit: 3.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:
Physiological, psychological, sociological and economic aspects for young, middle and old adulthood presented within a multidisciplinary perspective. Lifespan objectives are emphasized, including development as a life-long process, with multiple determinants of change, and correspondingly, multiple alternatives for change. Successful aging is also emphasized. Credit cannot be received in both DEP 4402 and DEP 4401.

Dr. Friedrich's Student Learning Outcomes

1. At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to:

2. Describe gerontology.  Define ageism.  Explain the lifespan perspective.

3. Understand the nature vs. nurture controversy.  Provide examples of the different types of aging.

4. Comprehend the major developmental designs of cross-sectional, longitudinal, and sequential.  Understand the primary differences between correlation and experimental research.

5. Explain the major differences among the theories of aging.  Comprehend the primary age-related changes in appearance and mobility, the senses, vital systems, reproductive system, and nervous system.

6. Describe the different types of longevity.  Describe primary genetic and environmental influences on aging.  Understand the primary issues involved in defining health and wellness.  Differentiate chronic from acute health conditions.  Identify significant coping mechanisms for stress.   Describe the major chronic conditions associated with aging.  Differentiate among contemporary trends in medication for chronic diseases.  Define functional health.  Comprehend the disablement process.

7. Define mental health and psychopathology.  Describe the multidimensional lifespan approach to psychopathology.  Differentiate among drug and behavioral therapies.  Differentiate among depression, delirium, and dementia.  Identify characteristics of older adult anxiety and psychotic disorders.

8. Comprehend person-environmental interaction models of competence/environmental press and congruence.  Differentiate among the long-term care facilities.  Understand the differences among normal, abnormal, and optimal aging.

9. Describe the information processing model for cognitive abilities.  Describe age-related changes in sensory, cognitive, and motor processing speed.

10. Differentiate among perceptual, short-term, and long-term memory capacities and strategies.  Understand age-related changes in types of memory.  Describe differences between memory in the laboratory and memory in everyday life.  Identify the primary aspects of self-efficacy in memory activities.  Describe the use of memory assessment for clinical disorders of older adults.

11. Comprehend the various models of intelligence.  Differentiate fluid from crystallized abilities and differential profiles of such abilities across the lifespan.  Understand models of post-formal thinking.  Describe expertise and wisdom.

12. Understand the social judgment processes.  Describe various forms of stereotyping, including self-stereotyping and stereotypic threat.  Explain control strategies and changes in such over the lifespan.

13. Define the five-factor trait model.  Differentiate traits for personal concerns and priorities.  Describe religiosity and spirituality.

14. Comprehend the concepts of friendships and social convoys.  Differentiate types of friendships and sibling relationships.  Identify factors contributing to love relationships and violent relationships.  Understand factors contributing to elder abuse.  Describe gender differences in widowhood.  Differentiate among role players in children, parents, grandparents and great-grandparents.

15. Define the meanings of work and retirement.  Summarize various theories of occupational development.  Differentiate among gender, ethnicity, and age bias and discrimination.

16. Describe the major leisure activities.  Understand why people retire.

17. Define various views of death and dying.  Differentiate active from passive euthanasia.  Describe death anxiety and factors contributing to severity of such anxiety.  Comprehend the Hospice option.  Differentiate among grieving processes.

18. Priorities the key issues related to health promotion in coming decades.  Identify and priorities personal and societal factors contributing to better aging.

 
Course: DEP4905 - DIRECTED STUDY
Hours: 0.0 - 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:
 
 
Course: DEP4990 - SPECIAL COURSE
Hours: 0.0 - 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:
 

Student Learning Outcomes:

1. Describe, compare, and contrast criteria for designation of child soldiers from multiple sources (e.g. United Nations, World Health Organization, International Rescue Committee).

2. Describe elements of risk and resiliency related to outcomes of children’s and adolescents’ participation in armed conflict as soldiers, victims, and displaced persons.

3. Analyze post-conflict interventions for child soldiers, victims, and displaced persons to identify those elements that are effective in minimizing maladaptive outcomes.

4. Develop a dossier for selected regions currently in armed conflict and post conflict including nature of conflict, impact on children and adolescents as soldiers, victims, and displaced persons, intervention programs, and limitations within the region.

5. Prepare and deliver an oral report based on the dossiers.

6. Use appropriate media for presentations.

7. Demonstrate use of Standard English and APA format in all written products.

Course: DEP4990L - SPECIAL COURSE - Lab in Child and Adolescent Development
Hours: 0.0 - 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:

Student Learning Outcomes:

1. Critically ANALYZE reports of empirical research on adolescents;

2. DEMONSTRATE knowledge of American Psychological Association style in all written work submitted.

3. DEMONSTRATE knowledge of research designs used in research on child and adolescent development;

4. DEMONSTRATE skills in analysis of empirical data collected from adolescent participants

5. PRESENT results of data analysis in writing and in an oral presentation

 6. INTERPRET results of data analysis

7. DEMONSTRATE and APPLY ethical guidelines unique to conducting empirical research with adolescents under the age of 18 years;

8. DEVELOP a proposal including a brief literature review that provides a rationale for a research question on a topic of interest and a methodology that provides a means for answering the research question and testing hypotheses.

 
Course: DEP4999 - SPECIAL COURSE
Hours: 0.0 - 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:
 
 
Course: DEP4XXXL - LABORATORY IN CHILD ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (PENDING)
Hours: 1.0 Repeatable For Credit: No Maximum Hours Credit: 1.0
Prerequisites: EXP 3082 and EXP 3082L
Corequisites: DEP 3103 or DEP 4304 (or as prerequisite)
Current Semester of Offering: Spring
Course Description:
Students will apply knowledge acquired in the Child Development and/or Psychology of Adolescence courses to develop research strategies that take into consideration the unique challenges in conducting research with children and adolescents. Use of archived data for exercises with opportunities to develop observation and analysis skills.
 
 
Course: DEP5055 - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Hours: 3.0 Repeatable For Credit: No Maximum Hours Credit: 3.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering: Spring Summer
Course Description:
Representative theories of development; methodological issues in developmental research; study of research knowledge in selected areas of developmental psychology. One undergraduate or graduate course in the area of developmental psychology is required.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Students who sucessfully complete this course will:

1. Understand major theoretical perspectives on human development;
            
2. Analyze major theoretical perspectives from a biopsychosocial standpoint;

3. Integrate various theoretical perspectives to provide descriptions, predictions, and explanations of key domains of human development;

4. Apply major theoretical perspectives on human development to themes of concern in today's society;

5. Compare and contrast Western perspectives on human development with perspectives and problems emerging from non-Western cultures

 
Course: DEP5905 - DIRECTED STUDY
Hours: 0.0 - 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:
 
 
Course: DEP5990 - SPECIAL COURSE
Hours: 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:

Student Learning Outcomes:

1. Describe, compare, and contrast criteria for designation of child soldiers from multiple sources (e.g. United Nations, World Health Organization, International Rescue Committee).

2. Describe elements of risk and resiliency related to outcomes of children’s and adolescents’ participation in armed conflict as soldiers, victims, and displaced persons.

3. Analyze post-conflict interventions for child soldiers, victims, and displaced persons to identify those elements that are effective in minimizing maladaptive outcomes.

4. Develop a dossier for selected regions currently in armed conflict and post conflict including nature of conflict, impact on children and adolescents as soldiers, victims, and displaced persons, intervention programs, and limitations within the region.

5. Prepare and deliver an oral report based on the dossiers.

6. Use appropriate media for presentations.

7. Demonstrate use of Standard English and APA format in all written products.

8. Participate as group facilitators during inclass group work.

9. Lead development of dossiers and presentations.

10. Write an end of course synopsis of group process and outcomes.

 
Course: DEP6990 - SPECIAL COURSE
Hours: 0.0 Repeatable For Credit: Yes Maximum Hours Credit: 0.0
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:
Current Semester of Offering:
Course Description:
 
 

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