Giving to the Department

We hope that you are as proud of the Chemistry Department at UWF as we are, and your continued help will enable us to move forward to the next stage of our development. Gifts from alumni and friends help to enhance the quality of our educational programs and enable us to constantly raise our standards of excellence. Since the Department offers only undergraduate degrees in chemistry, all resources have a direct impact on our undergraduate program. Specifically, funds are used in one or more of three target areas and support our teaching and research as well as offer academic enhancements for students and faculty. When you choose to continue to be a part of our success by donating, you will have an opportunity to determine how your gift is used. Every gift is significant and appreciated! In addition, all gifts to the UWF Chemistry Department are tax deductible.

The UWF alumni and friends website provides more information on how to make a gift to UWF. Click here. Be sure to indicate your gift is intended for the Chemistry Department. THANKS

Areas where your donations make an impact:

Student Support – Unfortunately, it is still true today that many students must work to support themselves during their time at UWF. Due to rising tuition and fees and ever increasing textbook costs, student outside workloads are getting to the levels where there are major conflicts between school and work . Scholarships allow students to concentrate on their studies to a greater degree to get the maximum learning experience from their time in the Department and at UWF.

As the Department increases its research activities, students will need an opportunity to attend scientific meetings to present their research results. In addition, it gives them a chance to hear and see first-hand presentations of cutting-edge scientific research by world-class scientists.

Research Support – In addition to the immediate impact donations have on the department's educational and research activities, there is the potential for a long term impact on the success rate of faculty member's research grants. Many of today's research funding agencies look at the current level of research activity in the department and the level of University and Department support for research activities, often in the form of matching funds, as major factors that influence their decisions to fund or not to fund. Thus, having funds to increase the department's research activities, and in some instances to use as "departmental matching funds", has a positive effect on our success in acquiring future funding from outside agencies such as National Science Foundation, Research Corporation, the American Chemical Society’s Petroleum Research Fund, etc.

Equipment & Instrumentation - An integral and unique component of the chemistry curriculum at UWF has been and remains the students' "hands on" experience using the many available instrumental methods for analysis of chemical samples within the department. We have an extensive array of scientific equipment available for use by the undergraduates in both formal coursework and research. However, some of the instruments are rather old and in need of upgrades, or complete replacement. In addition, there are additional scientific instruments that we are lacking which would make valuable improvements to our educational program.


Chemistry Foundation Accounts and Endowments

Ralph K. Birdwhistell Endowment – The endowment funds Ralph K. Birdwhistell Scholarships for full time chemistry majors in honor of “Dr. B” and his enormous impact on his students, the Department, and the University as a whole.

Founding Chemistry Faculty Endowment – In honor of the founding members of the Chemistry Department, money contributed to this account allows the Department to support awards and scholarships in recognition of Drs. Clifford Chang, Stephen Peter Tanner, Jerome E. Gurst and Bill Happern for their tremendous service to Chemistry Department at UWF. As of September 2011, the required minimum to establish an endowment has been met and the first award is planned for the 2012-2013 academic year.

Grace Po-Yuen Chiu Endowment – The endowment funds Grace Po-Yuen Chiu Scholarships for full-time chemistry majors in honor of Dr. Chiu and her tremendous impact on her students, the chemistry program at UWF, and the community. Preferably, the scholarship is awarded to international students.

Dr. Larry Manziek Memorial Endowment – In memory of Dr. Larry Manziek, BS '70, this endowment supports scholarships for full-time UWF chemistry majors. Dr. Manziek was a University of West Florida distinguished Chemistry alumnus, a good friend, a longtime advocate and UWF supporter. During the University's 40th Anniversary Celebration, Larry was recognized as one of forty distinguished alumni.

William D. Smart Seminar Series in Chemistry Endowment – The endowment provides support a chemistry seminar series which features renowned scientists and serves to expose students and faculty to cutting edge scientific research and ideas. The endowment was started with the generous support of William and Mary Smart in 2005.

Alumni Scholarship Account – We provide departmental scholarships to deserving chemistry students based on academic performance. Students are typically chosen by a faculty committee based on performance in chemistry courses.

General Chemistry Account – Donations into this account are typically used to facilitate program growth and development, supplement professional faculty development opportunities, enhance classroom and laboratory technology, and many other important Department needs.

Jerome E. Gurst Excellence in Chemistry Endowment – In honor of Dr. Jerome E. Gurst, who was one of the founding faculty members in chemistry and retired in 2007 after 40+ years of service at UWF, this endowment is meant to honor his legacy and service to UWF, the chemistry students, and his time as pre-medical adviser for all students pursing medical school from UWF. Proceeds from the endowment will be used to award scholarships to UWF chemistry majors based on academic merit and the student's interest in attending graduate school in a STEM discipline (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) as well as interests in issues of STEM diversity.