University of West Florida

Quantum Theory I

 

Syllabus

Course Description: This course is an interactive, hands-on course where students get to explore quantum mechanical systems utilizing simulations and group work.

This class consists of two meeting per week on Mondays and Wednesdays from 4:00 - 5:15 pm and will take place in the Modern Physics Lab (Bldg 4/ Rm 421). Your instructor will introduce concepts in the form of a "mini-lecture". You will then work, typically in groups of three on hands-on laboratory investigations and computer-based simulations. You will be investigating phenomena, understanding how they fit within the body of physics knowledge, and applying that knowledge. You must be responsive, think, and perform hands-on tasks during class. You are expected to read, search, and begin understanding the theory of each experiment and of the equipment before performing experiments. Students are strongly encouranged to asked questions of other students and of the instructor.

We will be replicating the way science is done - you will investigate phenomena, make conjectures, test conjectures, discuss, revise, test again, etc. With this approach, you have the opportunity to thoroughly understand the material.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Specifically, a student who masters this subject will have the following skills:

 

Course Strategy

Central to the course is developing an ability to think for yourself. There is no simple way to gain this skill; it comes slowly over time and with practice. You must be actively involved to learn the material. The course is structured with this in mind.

Preparation: You will be expected to regularly check the course website and familiarize yourself with the material for the next class. It would be foolish to think that one can fully grasp physics by reading the material alone, so the class time will be spent clarifying and applying the material. This is accomplished by communicating with your group mates, formulating group questions, and discussing these questions with your instructor.

Collaborative Work: Scientists and engineers work in groups as well as alone. Social interactions are critical to their success. Most good ideas grow out of discussions with colleagues. This course encourages and incorporates collaborative teamwork, a skill that is valued by most employers of scientists, engineers, and technicians. As you work and study together, you will help your partners to get over confusions, ask each other questions, and critique your group assignments. Everyone benefits from cooperative learning - expressing your ideas so that others can understand them helps clarify them for oneself.

Course Details:

Textbook: Quantum Mechanics A Paradigms Approach, by David H McIntyre, Pearson Education, ISBN-13: 978-0-321-76579-6

Software: All necessary software can be found on the computers in the Modern Physics Lab.

Class Web Site: Please look to the class web site for additional resources. The site contains this syllabus, problem assignments, homework solutions, and other resources. If you have any suggestions for improvements, don't hesitate to let me know. www.uwf.edu/awade1/Quantum%20Theory%20I/

Grading: In order to foster cooperation and collaboration among as many of you as possible, grades will based on an absolute scale. This means that helping others will not jeopardize your grades, it will, most likely, improve your grade as explaining concepts to other develops understanding for yourself. The grading scale is:

Grading Scale:

100%

A

>

90%

90%

A-

>

85%

85%

B+

>

80%

80%

B

>

75%

75%

B-

>

70%

70%

C+

>

67%

67%

C

>

64%

64%

C-

>

60%

60%

D

>

50%

50%

F

>

0%

 

The breakdown of components is:


Class Participation

20%

Homework and Assignments

40%

Tests

20%

Final Exam

20%

 

Prerequisites

PHY3106

Instructor

Aaron Wade, Assistant Professor

Office

Department of Physics, Building 4, Room 139

Phone

(850) 857-6140

E-mail

awade1@uwf.edu
Please put “PHY3107” in the subject line to ensure that your email gets sorted properly. Due to the large volume of emails I get on a daily basis, if you do not put the correct subject in your email, I may not respond to your email in a timely manner. If something urgent comes up that requires my immediate attention, please put “PHY3107 URGENT” in the subject of your email. Examples of topics that are urgent include: an accident or serious illness, military orders, death in your immediate family, etc.

Office Hours

MW 11:00am to 1:00 pm, and by appointment. These are the official times. I also have an open door policy. You can walk in any time. If I am there and I am free, I will talk to you.

Textbook

Quantum Mechanics A Paradigms Approach, by David H McIntyre, Pearson Education, ISBN-13: 978-0-321-76579-6

eLearning

The eLearning course page will contain the most up-to-date information regarding the course, i.e. the syllabus, due dates, announcements, and grades.

Course Expectations

Quantum Theory utilizes active learning techniques in the classroom. To succeed in this class, you will be expected to do the following:

  • Complete the required reading and associated warmup assignments
  • Attend class, answer questions, and participate in group discussions and problem solving
  • Complete your homework on time (the earlier the better!)

There will be no lecturing in the class. Each class will comprise of a series of investigations conducted by the students aimed at understanding quantum mechanics. I will be there to guide you, not to tell you or lecture to you.

Student Learning Outcomes

On completion of this course, the student should:

  • have a sound understanding of key concepts in quantum mechanics
  • be able to apply these concepts to analyze quantum mechanical systems
  • make both qualitative and quantitative predictions about the physics of the quantum world

Assignment Deadlines

All deadlines are precisely that and cannot be overridden except for medical reasons. The instructor reserves the right to adjust the deadlines based on the progression of the course.

Homework

There will be assignments linked to each chapters and new concepts. These are web, reading and traditional problem solving homework. Your success will depend on your honesty in doing them. Submission of homework must be before the set deadline. No excuses will be accepted. 

Tests

There will be a test at the end of each chapter. The tests and final will be in class, and comprise of a closed note and closed book part and an open note closed book part. It is a good idea to use and create a handwritten notebook during the lecture classes and summarize all the important concepts from the textbook. (Note: on all tests, a correct answer without work is worth 1 point out of 10 possible points.  How you get there is the most important part and is worth the most points.)

Grading Criteria

Organization is a key step in the learning processes of physics.  As such, all homework must be organized and should follow a structure similar to that found below (Note: a correct answer is worth 10% of your grade.  How you get to the answer is 90%.)
Please write legibly, and clearly mark each problem.
Show all of your work for each Concept and Problem.  

 

 

 

 

Problem Solving Strategy
Model:

  1. Classify the problem according to the general physics principles, models, and equations that apply. (e.g. Momentum Principle, Energy Principle, classical or relativistic).
  2. State what the question is asking for?
  3. Writing down reasonable assumptions and estimations needed to solve the problem.

Visualize:

Go back and forth between these representations as needed
Solve:

  1. Write down relevant general equations (express models and general physics principles in equation form).
  2. Make sure that you have enough equations to solve the problem (the same number of independent equations as variables).

Solve for the desired unknown variable (on the left of the equation) in terms of the known variables (on the right). This may require manipulating and combining several

Assess:

 

 

Student Conduct:
The University of West Florida supports an inclusive learning environment for all students. If there are aspects of the instruction or design of this course that hinder your full participation, such as time-limited exams, inaccessible web content, or the use of non-captioned videos and podcasts, reasonable accommodations can be arranged. Prior to receiving accommodations, you must register with the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC). Appropriate academic accommodations will be determined based on the documented needs of the individual. For information regarding the registration process, e-mail sdrc@uwf.edu or call (850) 474-2387.

Withdrawals:
UWF policy requires that students submit to the Office of Records and Registration a completed withdraw from courses, which is a different policy from that used by some other institutions, notably PSC. Withdrawals from this course that are processed by 03/28/2017 will result in a “W” grade being recorded. Withdrawals after this date can be done only by withdrawing from the University; the grade assigned will be W or WF. No withdrawals can be made after the close of classes.

Everything in Writing:
In an effort to prevent any confusion about deviations that may occur on a class and individual basis, everything must be in writing. This must include an email from the student and a confirmation email from the instructor. Verbal arrangements are not binding and will not be accepted as valid evidence toward any grievances the student may bring forward any time during or at the end of the term.

Help:
1. Instructor office hours (see above), and also available by appointment/email/or stop by anytime.
2. The Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC) at the University of West Florida supports an inclusive learning environment for all students. If there are aspects of the instruction or design of this course that hinder your full participation, such as time-limited exams, inaccessible web content, or the use of non-captioned videos and podcasts, please notify the instructor or the SDRC as soon as possible. You may contact the SDRC office by e-mail at sdrc@uwf.edu or by phone at (850) 474-2387. Appropriate academic accommodations will be determined based on the documented needs of the individual. SDRC will provide the student with a letter for the instructor that will specify any recommended accommodations.

Quantum Theory I | 11000 University Pkwy. | Pensacola, FL 32514 | (850) 474-2267 | physics@uwf.edu | Campus Map |